The Science of Sustainability

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Edible Insects: Finger Lickin' Grub

Edible Insects: Finger Lickin' Grub

"Insects do not taste like chicken," said Daniella Martin, a charismatic advocate of eating low – make that really low – on the food chain. Through public lectures, cooking demonstrations and her 'Girl Meets Bug' website, Martin preaches the gospel of why, in her opinion, more people should munch on mealworms, crunch a cricket or feast on plump bee larvae.

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Amateur Rocketeers Reach For The Stars

Amateur Rocketeers Reach For The Stars

For decades amateur rocket builders, or "rocketeers," have been trying to reach space. Now with advances in materials and technology, they're able to do it. QUEST travels to rocket launches in fallowed fields and barren deserts to learn more about this addictive hobby and to meet a group of passionate high school rocketeers.

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Science on the SPOT: New Hope for Heart Repair

Science on the SPOT: New Hope for Heart Repair

Scientists in San Francisco have coaxed mouse hearts to repair themselves from within.The breakthrough could lead to treatments for 5 million people in the United States whose hearts were damaged after they survived heart attacks.

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Science on the SPOT: Monarch Meetup

Science on the SPOT: Monarch Meetup

Monarch butterflies migrate from all over the western United States to overwinter along the California coast. Conservation Biologist Stu Weiss uses specialized photographic equipment to study what makes good monarch overwintering habitat.

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Science on the SPOT: National Wildlife Health Center Investigates

Science on the SPOT: National Wildlife Health Center Investigates

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center investigates animal die-offs and threats to endangered species through on-site investigation and necropsies–animal autopsy–at its headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin.

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New Research into Disappearing Bees

New Research into Disappearing Bees

In 2006, the world learned that honeybees in America and Canada were dying in large numbers, and hives were becoming defunct. Five years later, what have scientists learned about the causes of Colony Collapse Disorder?

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Why I Do Science: Kandis Elliot

Why I Do Science: Kandis Elliot

Kandis Elliot is on the Botany Department staff at the University of Wisconsin, but she's not a scientist or professor. Elliot is an artist and transforms mere photographs of plants into lush, painterly artworks that educate as well as captivate.

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The Juno Mission: Interview With NASA Scientist Dr. Bill Cooke

The Juno Mission: Interview With NASA Scientist Dr. Bill Cooke

What's old, is new again. Dr. Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, discusses how the historical astro-photographic plates at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) contribute to the new Juno mission to Jupiter.

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Exoskeletons Walk Forward

Exoskeletons Walk Forward

An exoskeleton suit may seem like science fiction, turning ordinary humans into super heroes, but wearable robots are moving forward into reality.

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Growing Skin

Growing Skin

Biomedical researchers are investigating ways to 'grow' new skin in hopes that healing burns can be quicker, safer and more complete.

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Why I Do Science: Danielle Reed

Why I Do Science: Danielle Reed

If you can't abide Brussels sprouts and broccoli, your genes may be to blame. Geneticist Danielle Reed of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia studies differences in our perception of taste and smell. A small blip in DNA might determine if you're bitter blind or have a sweet tooth.

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Science on the SPOT: Resurrecting the Dead

Science on the SPOT: Resurrecting the Dead

QUEST travels to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History to meet Linda Spurlock, an anatomist and forensic reconstruction artist who uses clay to re-construct the faces of ancient humans in order to show what they looked like when alive. She also sketches more recently deceased people using only their remains in order to help police solve crimes.

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Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big Fixes for Big Quakes

Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big Fixes for Big Quakes

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is hard at work on a $4.6 billion, decade-long construction project to overhaul the Hetch Hetchy water system, which delivers water from the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park and five local reservoirs to 2.5 million residents in the Bay Area.

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Your Photos on QUEST: Mike Forsberg

Your Photos on QUEST: Mike Forsberg

Mike Forsberg, a nationally renowned photographer, conservationist, and author from Nebraska, spent four years traveling 100,000 miles across the Great Plains—from North Dakota to Texas—to create a portrait of under-appreciated species and habitats of what many consider “flyover country.”

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The Night Sky: Past and Present

The Night Sky: Past and Present

For more than 150 years, scientists have captured images of celestial objects scattered across the night sky. The Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute in North Carolina is attempting to save those historical records before they vanish into a black hole.

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Asian Carp: Threat to Great Lakes

Asian Carp: Threat to Great Lakes

The invasive Asian carp has wreaked havoc in the Mississippi River system. The voracious plankton eaters have out-competed native fish and have become the dominant species in many locations. If the carp reach the Great Lakes, they pose a threat to its $7 billion fishery, so a battle against them is taking place on many fronts.

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Cool Critters: Lake Erie Water Snake

Cool Critters: Lake Erie Water Snake

Within and along the waters of Lake Erie (one of the five Great Lakes), there is a daily struggle for survival between natives and unwelcomed invasive species.

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Science on the SPOT: The Science of Salt Glaze Pottery

Science on the SPOT: The Science of Salt Glaze Pottery

The art and science of salt glaze pottery requires skills and techniques acquired over generations of trial and error. Ben Owen III combines his family’s experiential knowledge of ceramics and additional scientific knowledge to create and improve his unique works of art.

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Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Meet one of the three winners of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Lawrence Berkeley Lab astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter. He explains how dark energy, which makes up 70 percent of the universe, is causing our universe to expand.

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One Fish Two Fish: Monitoring Marine Protected Areas

One Fish Two Fish: Monitoring Marine Protected Areas

QUEST takes to the high seas with researchers Dirk Rosen, James Lindholm and their crew to study the underwater world off the California coast. In recent years, the state has established a network of marine protected areas to help fragile habitats and struggling fish populations bounce back. But are they working?

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