The Science of Sustainability

Tag: Wisconsin

Your City, Your Food

Your City, Your Food

If you needed to grow food in your city, where would you do it? How do you find space with healthy soil, safe water, and adequate sunlight? How do you know the space is safe, affordable, and accessible to the community? This QUEST classroom activity shows you how.

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Groundwater Wars: Potatoes versus Trout

Groundwater Wars: Potatoes versus Trout

In a state with more than a quadrillion gallons of groundwater, central Wisconsin residents have watched water levels in streams and lakes drop for years– where did the water go?

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Students Take Action to Restore Biodiversity and Revitalize a Community

Students Take Action to Restore Biodiversity and Revitalize a Community

Sixth graders at a charter school in Madison, Wisconsin, lead the charge to restore a local park and play a key role in efforts to revitalize a struggling community.

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Sustainable Spirits: Liquor for the Locavore

Sustainable Spirits: Liquor for the Locavore

Find out how an artisanal distillery is using locally-sourced ingredients to craft liquors that support a legacy of small agricultural producers on a storied Wisconsin Island.

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Gamers Going Green: New Video Game Turns Players Into Biofuel Farmers

Gamers Going Green: New Video Game Turns Players Into Biofuel Farmers

A new video game designed by computer scientists and ecologists is poised to shed light on the best way to manage biofuel farms.

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Iron Mining Controversy in Northern Wisconsin

Iron Mining Controversy in Northern Wisconsin

A pristine area in Northern Wisconsin next to Lake Superior, much prized for its clean water and wilderness, is also home to 25 percent of the country’s iron ore reserves, a commercial value of $200 billion.

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USGS at the Forefront of Saving Bats From White-Nose Syndrome (WNS)

USGS at the Forefront of Saving Bats From White-Nose Syndrome (WNS)

In the winter of 2007, residents of New York State began finding dead bats in their yards. Since then it’s estimated that more than a million bats have died from white-nose syndrome, a fuzzy white fungus that grows on their noses and wings.

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