The Science of Sustainability

Tag: QUEST

From Coal to Canvas:  An Artist Turns Toxic Runoff into Palette-Worthy Paints

From Coal to Canvas: An Artist Turns Toxic Runoff into Palette-Worthy Paints

Discover how an Ohio artist is repurposing runoff from coalmines to create a variety of rich paint pigments—and draw attention to the state’s polluted waterways.

Continue Reading

From Trash to Cash: Old Landfills Yield New Opportunities

From Trash to Cash: Old Landfills Yield New Opportunities

As resources become more expensive, America may start mining its landfills for raw materials.

Continue Reading

Tracking Your Ecological Footprint

Tracking Your Ecological Footprint

Online tools can track the true global costs of your lifestyle choices.

Continue Reading

L.E.D. There Be Light

L.E.D. There Be Light

Paying less for more: how energy-efficient LED bulbs outshine the competition while saving you money.

Continue Reading

The Living Machine: A Flush Worth Following

The Living Machine: A Flush Worth Following

Engineered to mimic a wetland, an innovative system at Oberlin College uses plants and microbes to recycle wastewater—a process that begins with a trip to the bathroom.

Continue Reading

Tesla Unveils 90-Second Battery Swap Technology

Tesla Unveils 90-Second Battery Swap Technology

Palo Alto based electric car maker Tesla has announced a service that will swap out a battery in less than two minutes.

Continue Reading

Restoring the Earth's "Kidneys"

Restoring the Earth's "Kidneys"

Urban development is impeding the ability of native wetlands to serve as natural filters, but efforts are underway in some places to reverse the damage.

Continue Reading

Outsourcing Your Compost: Soil Without The Stink

Outsourcing Your Compost: Soil Without The Stink

From Door to Spore: a reporter explores a new service that strives to make household composting easier.

Continue Reading

Debate Over on Climate Change, Says Chief UN Climate Negotiator

Debate Over on Climate Change, Says Chief UN Climate Negotiator

A United Nations expert recalls the exact moment she first witnessed the impact of climate change–and sees a concerted global effort as the only way to turn down the heat.

Continue Reading

Are Doughnuts Destroying Forests?

Are Doughnuts Destroying Forests?

A conversation with a forestry expert reveals doughnuts as unlikely contributors to global deforestation.

Continue Reading

Top KQED Science & QUEST Stories from 2012

Top KQED Science & QUEST Stories from 2012

From the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to killer whales, bicycles to cheese — it's been another year of diverse storytelling from the KQED Science and Environment team. Here's a round-up of the top 10 stories shared on our website (based on page views) that you've enjoyed in 2012.

Continue Reading

Tracing the Origins of the Durian’s Stench

Tracing the Origins of the Durian’s Stench

Researchers in Germany have identified compounds in durian that might be responsible for its unique smell.

Continue Reading

Creepy Yet Compelling: Blood Vessels Blown in Glass

Creepy Yet Compelling: Blood Vessels Blown in Glass

Halloween means time for gore! Blood, bones, brains and more! Severed fingers, severed toes, eyeballs and organs galore! But how accurate are all these loose bits of human anatomy in our front yards, costumes and punch bowls? Can we use that skeleton in the corner to bone up for a biology exam–or are we missing out on a tremendous opportunity to learn medical science?

Continue Reading

Women in Science: Meet a Mathematician, a Physicist and a Geologist Through Art

Women in Science: Meet a Mathematician, a Physicist and a Geologist Through Art

There's nothing like role models for inspiring the scientific spirits of women, today and tomorrow! And Marie Curie isn't the only one out there–history is rife with lesser-known but no less fabulous female scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.

Continue Reading

Information Is Beautiful Competition: San Francisco Design Company Takes Top Prize

Information Is Beautiful Competition: San Francisco Design Company Takes Top Prize

The Bay Area is a magnet for both artistic spirits and data freaks. So, although the inaugural Information is Beautiful award competition drew entries from around the world, perhaps it isn't too surprising that the ultimate prize was snagged by San Francisco design company Stamen.

Continue Reading

Saving Bighorn Sheep, One Mural At a Time

Saving Bighorn Sheep, One Mural At a Time

Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep are animals worth seeing. With their bright white rumps and the rams' remarkable headgear, they bound and leap over seemingly impassable alpine terrain. But you may have a tricky time spotting one–there are only about four hundred in existence.

Continue Reading

KQED Science News Coverage Expands

KQED Science News Coverage Expands

KQED Science coverage expands to include award winning Climate Watch team, Craig Miller and Molly Samuel.

Continue Reading

Illustrating Science: Translating Knowledge Into Pictures

Illustrating Science: Translating Knowledge Into Pictures

Allison Bruce has a wonderful job: she spends all day making pictures for scientists. Bruce started out in science herself, earning a chemistry degree from UC Davis. After college, she worked in an environmental lab, but she didn't enjoy it and turned to art classes "to keep from losing my mind," she says.

Continue Reading

Creative Use of a Cancer Mutation May Improve Nylon Production

Creative Use of a Cancer Mutation May Improve Nylon Production

Chemists want to reengineer metabolic proteins and pathways in microbes so they can convert sugar into commodity chemicals. Now a mutant protein found in cancer cells provides clues to help scientists improve a protein that could help microbes create a precursor to nylon. In science, as in so much of life, inspiration can come from unusual places.

Continue Reading

Science and the Flu: A Little Learning Is A Dangerous Thing

Science and the Flu: A Little Learning Is A Dangerous Thing

The first sniffles of flu season are upon us: a friend of mine was struck down, and couldn't join me in attending a science dialogue on Sunday night. This was darkly humorous, as the topic of the evening was pandemics.

Continue Reading