The Science of Sustainability

Tag: migration

Getting Up Close with Cranes

Getting Up Close with Cranes

For decades, scientists have studied the annual migration of sandhill cranes through central Nebraska. A new project is using time-lapse cameras to capture and study crane behavior.

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During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

As California's drought gets worse, farmers and conservationists are teaming up to create temporary wetlands for birds migrating on the Pacific Flyway.

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Birds, Blades, and the Brutal Business of Clean Energy

Birds, Blades, and the Brutal Business of Clean Energy

Does a shift toward renewable energy sources mean choosing between wind turbines and wildlife? Author William H. Funk weighs in.

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Gigantic Journeys: Humpback and Gray Whale Migration

Gigantic Journeys: Humpback and Gray Whale Migration

Perhaps no living thing has a better appreciation of the continuity of the seas than the largest animals in them: whales.

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It's Gray Whale Season!

It's Gray Whale Season!

It’s gray whale season. As you gaze out across the Pacific, you may see one.

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Migrating Monarch Butterflies Hunker Down in Monterey

Migrating Monarch Butterflies Hunker Down in Monterey

As you read this, monarch butterflies are arriving at their winter homes in Santa Cruz and Pacific Grove.

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Producer's Notes: The Great Migration

Producer's Notes: The Great Migration

When people think of bird migration, most naturally think of water fowl. Ducks and geese seem to get a lot of attention in that regard.

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Science Event Pick: Golden Gate Raptor Observatory’s 25th Anniversary

Science Event Pick: Golden Gate Raptor Observatory’s 25th Anniversary

In celebration of the 25th anniversary, there are a veritable flock of interactive events and talks scheduled over the next month.

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Disappearing Plants

Disappearing Plants

Scientists say the state's plants are at risk of collapse unless they migrate or are moved to refuges. According to a new study, two-thirds of California's unique plants, some 2,300 species that grow nowhere else in the world, could be wiped out across much of their current geographic ranges by the end of the century because of rising temperatures and changing rainfall patterns.

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