The Science of Sustainability

Tag: lcross

Much More Water on the Moon than Previously Thought

Much More Water on the Moon than Previously Thought

NASA scientists reveal that water on the moon isn’t spread out in vast oceans, but rather is concentrated in oases, and that the lunar surface appears to contain a wealth of other materials.

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NASA Moon Mission Reveals New Clues About Water on the Moon

NASA Moon Mission Reveals New Clues About Water on the Moon

NASA scientists reveal that water on the moon isn’t spread out in vast oceans, but rather is concentrated in oases, and that the lunar surface appears to contain a wealth of other materials.

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Lunar Ice Smack-down a Success!

Lunar Ice Smack-down a Success!

NASA's LCROSS mission found water on the Moon, no bones about it. Though NASA is still analyzing all the data they reaped from the LCROSS impact event on October 9th, and will be for a long time to come, they seem confident enough about the preliminary findings to make this a definite declaration of discovery!

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MOON Spells "Water"

MOON Spells "Water"

Even before NASA's LCROSS spacecraft is set to hit the Moon and hopefully kick up a cloud containing water, evidence for the presence of water on the Moon is mounting.

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Science Event Pick: LCROSS—Hitch-hiking to the Moon

Science Event Pick: LCROSS—Hitch-hiking to the Moon

As the satellite impact grows closer, NASA is making an effort to talk about the locally driven mission. Many of the upcoming talks are suitable for any audience, from kids to adults.

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Neil Armstrong's Lunar Footprint Turns 40

Neil Armstrong's Lunar Footprint Turns 40

What were you doing 40 years ago, on July 20th, 1969, when the first human foot (booted, not bare) made its impression on the gritty surface of the Moon?

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Reporter's Notes: Crash Landing

Reporter's Notes: Crash Landing

When the LCROSS satellite, nicknamed Centaur, smacks into the south pole of the moon in late October, it is expected to produce a plume of dust 37 miles high, which may be visible from Earth with a good backyard telescope. It will be visible in an arc from Hawaii to Texas.

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Shooting the Moon

Shooting the Moon

Launching a spacecraft bound for the Moon with the deliberate intention of striking the Moon in a spectacular impact! Sounds like something out of a Jules Verne novel…

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Producer's Notes: LCROSS Rocket to the Moon

Producer's Notes: LCROSS Rocket to the Moon

The goal is to see if water exists on the moon and if it does, buried deep beneath the lunar soil, accumulating over millions of years of impacts with comets, it would accelerate our efforts to establish a permanent lunar base.

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