The Science of Sustainability

Tag: kqed

Your City, Your Food

Your City, Your Food

If you needed to grow food in your city, where would you do it? How do you find space with healthy soil, safe water, and adequate sunlight? How do you know the space is safe, affordable, and accessible to the community? This QUEST classroom activity shows you how.

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Transforming San Francisco Into a Model of Disaster Preparedness

Transforming San Francisco Into a Model of Disaster Preparedness

The next “big one” is never out of mind for San Francisco residents who may have a new place to gather if one landscape architecture firm has its way.

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The World with Us: Can the Earth Support Eleven Billion?

The World with Us: Can the Earth Support Eleven Billion?

Journalist Alan Weisman's latest book, Countdown, explores how we can sustainably manage a population of seven billion people.

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The Great Escape: How Soil Protects Us from Carbon Emissions

The Great Escape: How Soil Protects Us from Carbon Emissions

Recent measurements show that the billions of tons of old carbon hidden deep in the earth may release into the atmosphere, greatly accelerating climate change.

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Captive Breeding Program May Ensure Survival for African Frogs

Captive Breeding Program May Ensure Survival for African Frogs

As “canaries in the coal mine” for a changing environment, a select group of African frogs may help scientists protect endangered frog species far and wide.

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Urban Farms in San Francisco Struggle to Put Down Roots

Urban Farms in San Francisco Struggle to Put Down Roots

Although urban agriculture is on the rise nationwide, in locavore-loving San Francisco, some difficult challenges are emerging

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Are Wetlands Nature's Best Defense Against Sea Level Rise?

Are Wetlands Nature's Best Defense Against Sea Level Rise?

Restoring marshlands along the shore of San Francisco Bay may be the key to protecting communities from rising sea level and it may lend a helping hand to some endangered species, too.

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Tesla Unveils 90-Second Battery Swap Technology

Tesla Unveils 90-Second Battery Swap Technology

Palo Alto based electric car maker Tesla has announced a service that will swap out a battery in less than two minutes.

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Work Begins on Largest Dam Removal Project in California History

Work Begins on Largest Dam Removal Project in California History

Construction crews are starting work on the largest dam removal project in California history.

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Debate Over on Climate Change, Says Chief UN Climate Negotiator

Debate Over on Climate Change, Says Chief UN Climate Negotiator

A United Nations expert recalls the exact moment she first witnessed the impact of climate change–and sees a concerted global effort as the only way to turn down the heat.

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Tracing the Origins of the Durian’s Stench

Tracing the Origins of the Durian’s Stench

Researchers in Germany have identified compounds in durian that might be responsible for its unique smell.

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Creepy Yet Compelling: Blood Vessels Blown in Glass

Creepy Yet Compelling: Blood Vessels Blown in Glass

Halloween means time for gore! Blood, bones, brains and more! Severed fingers, severed toes, eyeballs and organs galore! But how accurate are all these loose bits of human anatomy in our front yards, costumes and punch bowls? Can we use that skeleton in the corner to bone up for a biology exam–or are we missing out on a tremendous opportunity to learn medical science?

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Women in Science: Meet a Mathematician, a Physicist and a Geologist Through Art

Women in Science: Meet a Mathematician, a Physicist and a Geologist Through Art

There's nothing like role models for inspiring the scientific spirits of women, today and tomorrow! And Marie Curie isn't the only one out there–history is rife with lesser-known but no less fabulous female scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.

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Information Is Beautiful Competition: San Francisco Design Company Takes Top Prize

Information Is Beautiful Competition: San Francisco Design Company Takes Top Prize

The Bay Area is a magnet for both artistic spirits and data freaks. So, although the inaugural Information is Beautiful award competition drew entries from around the world, perhaps it isn't too surprising that the ultimate prize was snagged by San Francisco design company Stamen.

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Saving Bighorn Sheep, One Mural At a Time

Saving Bighorn Sheep, One Mural At a Time

Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep are animals worth seeing. With their bright white rumps and the rams' remarkable headgear, they bound and leap over seemingly impassable alpine terrain. But you may have a tricky time spotting one–there are only about four hundred in existence.

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Illustrating Science: Translating Knowledge Into Pictures

Illustrating Science: Translating Knowledge Into Pictures

Allison Bruce has a wonderful job: she spends all day making pictures for scientists. Bruce started out in science herself, earning a chemistry degree from UC Davis. After college, she worked in an environmental lab, but she didn't enjoy it and turned to art classes "to keep from losing my mind," she says.

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Creative Use of a Cancer Mutation May Improve Nylon Production

Creative Use of a Cancer Mutation May Improve Nylon Production

Chemists want to reengineer metabolic proteins and pathways in microbes so they can convert sugar into commodity chemicals. Now a mutant protein found in cancer cells provides clues to help scientists improve a protein that could help microbes create a precursor to nylon. In science, as in so much of life, inspiration can come from unusual places.

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Science and the Flu: A Little Learning Is A Dangerous Thing

Science and the Flu: A Little Learning Is A Dangerous Thing

The first sniffles of flu season are upon us: a friend of mine was struck down, and couldn't join me in attending a science dialogue on Sunday night. This was darkly humorous, as the topic of the evening was pandemics.

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California Wildlife Mural Celebrates Its Third Birthday

California Wildlife Mural Celebrates Its Third Birthday

In 2009, after West Valley College built its brand new biology building, a group of faculty stood in the natural history lab staring at a blank wall. "It's too empty," they agreed. "How about a mural?" suggested biology and genetics instructor Molly Schrey.

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H2-Whoa: Computing With Water Instead of Electrons

H2-Whoa: Computing With Water Instead of Electrons

Superhydrophobic surfaces enable simple water-based data storage and logic.

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