The Science of Sustainability

Tag: carbon dioxide

Ocean Acidification: The Basics

Ocean Acidification: The Basics

More than half of the CO2 emitted by humans has been absorbed by the ocean. Scientists say this means less CO2 in the air, but it also means a change in ocean chemistry — ocean acidification. Now what?

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Pteropods: Very Small and Very Important

Pteropods: Very Small and Very Important

Pteropods are sometimes called “sea butterflies,” but they’re actually free-floating snails. They play a big part in the ocean food web. How does ocean acidification impact these small creatures?

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From the Top of the Space Needle: A New View on Carbon Emissions

From the Top of the Space Needle: A New View on Carbon Emissions

A CO2 monitor atop Seattle’s Space Needle supplies empirical data on the city's carbon emissions

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Sea Otters v. Climate Change

Sea Otters v. Climate Change

Discover the surprising connection between sea otters, kelp forests, and our quest to slow the progress of climate change.

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Harnessing The Hidden Power of Cow Manure

Harnessing The Hidden Power of Cow Manure

A dairy farm in British Colombia uses new technologies to convert manure into electricity, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and remove the stink.

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West Coast a Test Bed for Ocean Acidification

West Coast a Test Bed for Ocean Acidification

Scientists say the waters off the West Coast could be hit hard by ocean acidification, but thanks to the natural conditions, it's a good place to study how ocean species might adapt.

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Which Are Gassier, Volcanoes or Humans?

Which Are Gassier, Volcanoes or Humans?

Volcanoes release a lot of gas, including carbon dioxide. Can we blame them for climate change instead of us?

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The View from Coal Country in the Age of Green

The View from Coal Country in the Age of Green

Coal produces nearly half the electricity in the U.S., but the mercury, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide it emits also makes it one of the most controversial energy sources. For many environmental activists, coal represents an old, dirty source of power, but for coal-mining communities around the country, the story is different.

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Reporter's Notes: Building Blocks Go Green

Reporter's Notes: Building Blocks Go Green

I got interested in this story after hearing Silicon Valley venture capitalist Vinod Khosla speak at a conference this fall in Sausalito. He explained how he decides where to invest in green tech and it was fascinating. He and other top venture capitalists think they can help stop global warming and make a ton of money at the same time.

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Reporter's Notes: Acidic Seas

Reporter's Notes: Acidic Seas

The scientists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) are already well-known for uncovering some of the most extreme marine animals in the deep sea, like the incredible vampire squid. But recently, they're using their unique blend of biology and engineering to study one of the least-discussed impacts of climate change: ocean acidification.

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Acidic Seas

Acidic Seas

Melting glaciers, rising temperatures and droughts – all are impacts of global warming. What receives much less attention is the toll that climate change is taking on the health of our oceans. The sea, it turns out, absorbs carbon dioxide emissions, which are causing it to become more acidic. Changing pH levels threaten the entire marine food chain from coral reefs to salmon.

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