The Science of Sustainability

ideastream® is public broadcasting and a whole lot more. ideastream is a non-profit organization that applies the power of media to education, culture and citizenship. It includes WVIZ/PBS, 90.3 WCPN and WCLV 104.9, educational and public service cable channels, broadband interactive video distance learning, the Internet and other interactive media. Based on careful and ongoing ascertainment of community needs, ideastream acquires, creates and delivers content that connects those who seek knowledge with those who have it.

ideastream leverages technical, creative and financial resources through partnerships with other organizations that share interests in education and public service. Support comes primarily from contributions made by individuals, foundations and corporations. Funding from state and federal agencies also plays a critical role. ideastream has attracted national attention as a new model for public service media. 2.8 million people in Cleveland, Northeast Ohio and beyond are touched by ideastream programs and services in a typical month.

Secrets of the Spider Web

Secrets of the Spider Web

Watch a biologist extract silk from a live spider, as he works to uncover the secrets of this surprisingly versatile material.

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Local Farmer Sets His Sights on a New Crop: Crickets

Local Farmer Sets His Sights on a New Crop: Crickets

Insect protein is all the buzz lately, and for good reason — it doesn’t require many resources to produce. Now one urban farmer in Ohio wants to cash in on that trend.

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From Squalor to Shiitakes: the World's First Biocellar

From Squalor to Shiitakes: the World's First Biocellar

Lots of people are experimenting with ways to deal with urban blight. In this new video from QUEST Ohio, watch how one man is turning an abandoned house into what could be the world’s first “biocellar.”

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The Skin of a Building and Why it Matters

The Skin of a Building and Why it Matters

Retrofitting the “skin” of an older building can save energy and money. Climb inside one company’s test chamber with QUEST Ohio to find out more.

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Biodegradable Plastics: Too Good to Be True?

Biodegradable Plastics: Too Good to Be True?

Products advertised as “green” aren't always what they appear to be. New research from Ohio State University adds supposedly biodegradable plastics to that list.

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How to Plant a Backyard Rain Garden

How to Plant a Backyard Rain Garden

This growing season, consider planting a different kind of garden, one that will sop up stormwater and take pressure off the sewage system.

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Food Scraps:  An Urbanite’s Dilemma

Food Scraps: An Urbanite’s Dilemma

When it comes to doing what’s best for the environment, compost is king. But sometimes it doesn’t fit into city life. Garbage disposals offer a simpler solution for getting rid of food scraps, but how do they stack up?

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From Coal to Canvas:  An Artist Turns Toxic Runoff into Palette-Worthy Paints

From Coal to Canvas: An Artist Turns Toxic Runoff into Palette-Worthy Paints

In this video from QUEST Ohio, discover how an artist is repurposing runoff from coalmines to create a variety of rich paint pigments—and draw attention to the state’s polluted waterways.

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Urban Neighborhood is Perfect Place to Grow Lettuce

Urban Neighborhood is Perfect Place to Grow Lettuce

A $17 million greenhouse pioneers large-scale hydroponic technology and replaces vacant land in a troubled Cleveland neighborhood.

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Let Them Eat Flies

Let Them Eat Flies

QUEST goes behind the scenes at an innovative “bug farm” in Ohio, where engineer and entrepreneur Glen Courtright harnesses the power of flies to turn food waste into sustainable fish feed.

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Vacant Lots Get a Green Makeover

Vacant Lots Get a Green Makeover

Vacant lots are a big problem for cities with population loss, like Cleveland, where researchers are testing a cost-efficient way to transform abandoned land into spaces that revitalize neighborhoods and improve the environment.

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Dredging Up a Problem

Dredging Up a Problem

The Cuyahoga River in northeast Ohio — known for catching fire in the 1960s — relies on frequent dredging to keep the shipping channels open. Now a controversial new proposal to dump the dredged material into Lake Erie has residents worried about contamination of the public water supply.

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Out of Sight, Out of Mine

Out of Sight, Out of Mine

Many Midwestern mines ceased operation long ago, but surrounding land and streams still feel their toxic effects.

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Getting the Munchies for Hemp

Getting the Munchies for Hemp

More people are turning to hemp seeds as a source of healthy fats and protein, and as a sustainable crop.

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From Screenwriter to Soil-Saver: The Double Legacy of Louis Bromfield

From Screenwriter to Soil-Saver: The Double Legacy of Louis Bromfield

Best known as a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, and Hollywood hobnobber, Louis Bromfield was also celebrated as a pioneer of sustainable agriculture — a lesser-known part of his legacy that lives on today at his Ohio farm.

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Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

In response to the major threats posed to the Great Lakes by invasive Asian carp, engineers have developed devices to keep them out, but delays in deciding how to implement them might give the fish an edge.

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Canola, Flax, and Sunflower: The Hidden Power of Oilseeds

Canola, Flax, and Sunflower: The Hidden Power of Oilseeds

Much more than just an alternative to cooking with butter and animal fats, oilseeds hold the promise of additional benefits to our health, economy, and environment.

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Tracking Your Own Footprints: Digital Tools to Inspire Conservation

Tracking Your Own Footprints: Digital Tools to Inspire Conservation

Oberlin researchers hope to change the public’s personal habits by offering tools to help track resource use in buildings and cities.

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Why a Dark Sky Matters

Why a Dark Sky Matters

Big city lights may put some dazzle in the night sky, but they also cause problems for people and other creatures attuned to darkness.

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How Were Fossil Fuels Formed?

How Were Fossil Fuels Formed?

In this activity you will learn more about how one fossil fuel — shale gas — formed thousands of feet beneath certain parts of the United States.

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