The Science of Sustainability

KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, and as a leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.

My Wild Tech-Free American Summer

My Wild Tech-Free American Summer

At Camp Grounded, urbanites shed devices to reconnect with nature.

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Fish to Fork: The Rise of Community-Supported Fisheries

Fish to Fork: The Rise of Community-Supported Fisheries

Community-supported fisheries seek to reverse the trend of diminishing local seafood supplies.

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Tobacco Gets a Makeover as New Source for Biofuel

Tobacco Gets a Makeover as New Source for Biofuel

Is a new biofuel a win for renewable energy or the far-reaching arms of the tobacco industry?

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Reawakening Extinct Species

Reawakening Extinct Species

Explore efforts to bring back extinct species in this QUEST documentary. Should we turn back the clock?

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QUEST TV: Highway to Hydrogen

QUEST TV: Highway to Hydrogen

Although auto makers have spent decades and billions of dollars to develop hydrogen fuel cell cars, only a few hundred of them are on the nation's roads. With new refueling stations in development and new models recently unveiled, are these zero-emission vehicles finally ready to roll?

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Nonrenewable and Renewable Energy Resources

Nonrenewable and Renewable Energy Resources

This infographic depicts the two major categories of energy resources: nonrenewable and renewable.

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The Key to Sustainable Fish Farming? Vegetarian Fish

The Key to Sustainable Fish Farming? Vegetarian Fish

World demand for seafood is rising, but many of the world’s oceans are already overfished. Now scientists are creating vegetarian diets for species like trout, which may lessen the strain on over-fished oceans.

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During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

As California's drought gets worse, farmers and conservationists are teaming up to create temporary wetlands for birds migrating on the Pacific Flyway.

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In Dry Year, California Looks to Cloud Seeding

In Dry Year, California Looks to Cloud Seeding

There’s no doubt about it – it’s dry out there. 2013 ended as the driest year ever recorded in many parts of California. So water managers are trying to squeeze out every last drop with an old technology: cloud seeding.

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Career Spotlight: Insulation and Coatings Technician

Career Spotlight: Insulation and Coatings Technician

Samuel Weatherwax is an insulation and coatings technician for a geothermal power plant.

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Career Spotlight: Microbiologist

Career Spotlight: Microbiologist

Aindrila Mukhopadhyay is a microbiologist who directs a group researching ways to use microbes to convert plants into biofuels.

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Career Spotlight: Kite Designer

Career Spotlight: Kite Designer

Damon Vander Lind works at Makani Power building high-altitude kites that can generate more power than conventional wind turbines.

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Career Spotlight: Mechatronics Engineer

Career Spotlight: Mechatronics Engineer

Leila Madrone is a mechatronics engineer who leads a team that is designing heliostats — mechanisms used in concentrating solar power systems.

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Transforming San Francisco Into a Model of Disaster Preparedness

Transforming San Francisco Into a Model of Disaster Preparedness

The next “big one” is never out of mind for San Francisco residents who may have a new place to gather if one landscape architecture firm has its way.

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Largest Solar Plant in the World Goes Through Last Test Before Opening

Largest Solar Plant in the World Goes Through Last Test Before Opening

The largest solar plant in the world – in California’s Mojave Desert – goes through its last test before opening, after a debate that pitted renewable energy against a threatened tortoise.

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Using Social Media to Rescue Food

Using Social Media to Rescue Food

In the U.S., more than 30 million tons of food end up in landfills each year. The food waste occurs throughout the food chain, from farm to table. But now social media is being mobilized to rescue surplus food and keep it from going to waste.

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Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife

Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife

Drivers hit thousands of animals every year on California freeways, often killing the wildlife, and sometimes killing or injuring the human, too. Several western states have built fencing and other infrastructure to help wildlife cross freeways safely, and critics say California could be doing a lot more of the same.

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Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Go behind the scenes with the scientists working to keep Lake Tahoe pristine and protect it for generations to come.

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Stanford Solar Car Races Across Australian Desert

Stanford Solar Car Races Across Australian Desert

Stanford University students design and race a single passenger solar car 1,800 miles across the Australian continent in an international competition that pushes the boundaries of solar-powered technology.

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Fighting Food Waste

Fighting Food Waste

Forty percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes uneaten. From "farm to fork", there are many reasons for food waste, including consumer demand for perfect produce and confusion over expiration dates printed on packaged foods. This massive waste occurs as one in six Americans struggles with hunger every day, even in affluent regions such as Silicon Valley.

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