The Science of Sustainability

Physics

Try These at Home: 2 Sure-fire Science Demo Classics

Try These at Home: 2 Sure-fire Science Demo Classics

Quick how-to's to make your own non-newtonian matter; float a ball in mid-air indefinitely; pronounce "Bernoulli."

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Scary Tsunamis

Scary Tsunamis

In 2004, a massive tsunami struck the Indian Ocean. More than 225,000 people were killed. Bay Area researchers raced to the scene to learn everything they could about these deadly forces of nature.

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Producer's Notes: Scary Tsunamis

Producer's Notes: Scary Tsunamis

On January 26, 1700, at about 9:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time one of the largest earthquakes ever to strike the Pacific Northwest rumbled across the Cascadia Subduction Zone. This massive earthquake sent a giant 33 foot high tsunami crashing onto shore, inundating the quiet coastline.

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QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion

QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion

Paul Doherty of the Exploratorium performs a "sit-down" lecture on one of Sir Issac Newton's most famous laws.

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Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances

Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances

How do we know how far away celestial objects are? This shouldn't be taken for granted, as it's not as straightforward as sounding the depth of the ocean.

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New Nanoparticles Shed Light on Cell Behavior

New Nanoparticles Shed Light on Cell Behavior

Happily, while Michael Crichton's nanoparticles coordinate an attack on a your vital organs, these new bright, stable particles behave more like benign light bulbs in your cells.

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Playing the Oldest Recordings

Playing the Oldest Recordings

Last summer, QUEST told you about how scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab have developed a technology to playback old audio recordings using visual scans.

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The National Ignition Facility: An Energetic Defense

The National Ignition Facility: An Energetic Defense

For all of the laser's exciting aspirations and promise of new technology, the press' reaction to NIF throughout the twelve years of its construction has been often lukewarm, and at worst scornful.

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QUEST Lab: The Resonator

QUEST Lab: The Resonator

Quest goes to the Exploratorium to learn how and why helium changes the sound of your voice.

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An Ode to Enrico Fermi

An Ode to Enrico Fermi

The concept of the "Fermi Problem"–a hard question made readily accessible by back-of-the-envelope calculations and familiar knowledge–is still powerful in physics and beyond. Science teachers routinely use these types of questions as brain teasers.

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Shooting the Moon

Shooting the Moon

Launching a spacecraft bound for the Moon with the deliberate intention of striking the Moon in a spectacular impact! Sounds like something out of a Jules Verne novel…

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Superconductivity: an Arsenic-Laced Future?

Superconductivity: an Arsenic-Laced Future?

In February of last year scientists discovered a new champion in their quest for a better superconductor, a material based on iron and, curiously enough, arsenic.

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Goodbye to the Bevatron

Goodbye to the Bevatron

For the last 18 years, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has had the physics equivalent of a rusty pickup truck parked in its front yard. Now, the 1950s era Bevatron is being demolished, and a chapter in the Bay Area's history of high level physics research comes to a close.

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Goodbye to the Bevatron

Goodbye to the Bevatron

For the last 18 years, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has had the physics equivalent of a rusty pickup truck parked in its front yard. Now, the 1950s era Bevatron is being demolished, and a chapter in the Bay Area's history of high level physics research comes to a close.

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Reporter's Notes: Goodbye to the Bevatron

Reporter's Notes: Goodbye to the Bevatron

Much as I tried to get Stewart Loken to wax poetic about the demise of the Bevatron, the truth is that he – and, I'll bet, a lot of scientists – just don't think that way.

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UC Berkeley Gets Its Science On: Cal Day 2009, April 18

UC Berkeley Gets Its Science On: Cal Day 2009, April 18

On Saturday April 18th, the University opens up to the public…lectures, interactive events, tours, all of the campus museums (most of which aren't usually open to the public)… and it's all free.

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QUEST Quiz: The Moon

QUEST Quiz: The Moon

In an average lifetime, a person experiences about 936 full Moons. So, how old is the Moon? How was it formed? Take the QUEST Quiz to find out how much you REALLY know about Earth's Moon.

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The World's Most Powerful Microscope

The World's Most Powerful Microscope

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab recently turned on a $27 million electron microscope. Its ability to make images to a resolution half the width of a hydrogen atom made it the most powerful microscope in the world.

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Web Extra: Images from the World's Most Powerful Microscope

Web Extra: Images from the World's Most Powerful Microscope

See a selection of the new amazing atomic-scale images from the TEAM microscope seen in our Video "The World's Most Powerful Microscope."

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Zeppelins Resurrected

Zeppelins Resurrected

In 1935, the USS Macon went down in 1000 feet of water off the coast of Monterey, California. Now, as scientists study the recently-discovered wreckage, dirigibles are returning to the Bay Area. But these aren't the same dirigibles – these are new and improved.

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