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Space Shuttle Endeavour Makes a Bay Area Victory Lap

Space Shuttle Endeavour Makes a Bay Area Victory Lap

The Endeavour flyover will make for a striking sight: Piggybacked to a 747, the shuttle will be flying at a low altitude of 1500 feet in some parts of the Bay Area.

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Is Nail Biting a Pathology? Or Just a Bad Habit?

Is Nail Biting a Pathology? Or Just a Bad Habit?

Nail biting — like skin picking and hair tending — stems from an evolutionarily adaptive behavior: grooming. But in "pathological groomers," as they're known in in the world of psychiatry, that healthy urge goes haywire.

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California's Prop. 37: Are GMO Labels a Scarlet Letter?

California's Prop. 37: Are GMO Labels a Scarlet Letter?

Proposition 37 could make California the first state in the country to require "Made with GMO" labels on genetically-engineered foods. But would the labels inform people? Or scare them?

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The Heat is On For California Wines

The Heat is On For California Wines

You’ve probably heard of the wines that made Napa and Sonoma famous, like Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay. But what about Negroamaro or Nero d’Avola? They’re wine grapes that are well-adapted to hotter temperatures — the kind of conditions that California may be facing as the climate continues to warm.

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California Considers Giving Self-Driving Cars Green Light

California Considers Giving Self-Driving Cars Green Light

California is considering rules that would allow self-driving cars on the road, but making rules for robots is no simple task.

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Building a Better, Tastier Tomato

Building a Better, Tastier Tomato

Many tomatoes have been bred to travel well and look appealing, but now researchers are focusing on making them more nutritious and better tasting.

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Internet in Cars: From the Desktop to the Dashboard

Internet in Cars: From the Desktop to the Dashboard

Car companies and Silicon Valley tech companies pair up to make smarter cars. But what happens when the internet makes its way into our dashboards?

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NASA's Mars Lander: The Exploration Begins

NASA's Mars Lander: The Exploration Begins

NASA's Curiosity lander has ended its 352 million-mile journey, landing safely on the surface of Mars. For scientists at NASA Ames in Moffet Field, the work is just beginning.

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California Considers Banning Dogs in Bear Hunts

California Considers Banning Dogs in Bear Hunts

The legislature is considering a bill that would ban the use of hounds in both bear and bobcat hunting in the state.

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A Unique HIV Case Inspires New Research

A Unique HIV Case Inspires New Research

More than 34 million people live with HIV/AIDS worldwide but only one person may have been cured of the virus. We look at promising, genetic research that is aimed at replicating this apparent cure.

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Space Telescope to Begin Search for Black Holes

Space Telescope to Begin Search for Black Holes

NASA's newest space telescope, NuStar, will soon begin its hunt for black holes. Scientists are hoping to learn more about how they grow and why they're such messy eaters.

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From Alvin to Robots: Deep Changes in Ocean Science

From Alvin to Robots: Deep Changes in Ocean Science

Ocean technology has come a long ways since the submersible Alvin made its first dive in 1964. Increasingly, scientists rely on robots, rather than manned subs like Alvin, to explore the earth's depths. But can remote-control exploration capture the thrill of science?

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Bio-Robotics: Biology Goes High-Tech

Bio-Robotics: Biology Goes High-Tech

Meet "robo-squirrel." New technology in the emerging field of bio-robotics is helping biologists learn more about animal behavior.

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Diversity in the Valley: The NewME Accelerator (Part Two)

Diversity in the Valley: The NewME Accelerator (Part Two)

This week we’re back in Silicon Valley, with a program called NewME, or New Media Entrepreneurship. It’s designed to encourage women and minorities to found technology companies. Seven participants from around the country shared a house in San Francisco for three months, got coached on their business plans and attempted to perfect the art of the pitch.

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Diversity in the Valley: The NewME Accelerator (Part One)

Diversity in the Valley: The NewME Accelerator (Part One)

If you look around Silicon Valley, ideas all seem to be coming from the same kind of people. By a recent estimate, one percent of technology entrepreneurs were African American. Only eight percent of companies were founded by women. One program aims to change this by encouraging more women and minorities to launch companies.

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Energy-Saving Windows Get Smarter

Energy-Saving Windows Get Smarter

Buildings are responsible for 40% of the country’s energy use. So, researchers are trying improve our energy efficiency by making windows dynamic and intelligent.

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California's Deadlocked Delta: Is Carbon Farming the Future?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Is Carbon Farming the Future?

California’s Delta has a rich agricultural legacy, but farming there can be a risky business. Dozens of farms have been flooded over the past half century as aging levees have collapsed. Now, scientists are encouraging farmers to switch to a new crop. Instead of growing vegetables, they’d grow something that has all but disappeared in the Delta: wetlands.

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California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Delta is a far cry from what it once was. About 97% of its historic marshes have been lost and scientists aren’t quite sure what the Delta once looked like. Now, a Bay Area group is working to reconstruct it through ecological detective work.

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California's Deadlocked Delta: Can it Be Fixed?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can it Be Fixed?

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta has been the subject of a decades-long water war, but most Californians have never heard of it. Why is it so important? And can the state ever break the water deadlock?

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Life on The Gate: Working on the Golden Gate Bridge 1933-37

Life on The Gate: Working on the Golden Gate Bridge 1933-37

This year marks the 75th anniversary of an icon. When it opened in 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge was the longest suspension bridge ever built, constructed in one of the world’s most challenging settings. For the men who poured the concrete, and drove in each iron rivet, it was a life-changing experience.

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