The Science of Sustainability

Biology

Pregnant Women Face Big Questions With Cheaper DNA Sequencing

Pregnant Women Face Big Questions With Cheaper DNA Sequencing

In the very near future, a pregnant woman will be able to learn a whole lot more than she currently can about the fetus she is carrying. And she can find out in a way that poses no risk to the fetus.

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A Unique HIV Case Inspires New Research

A Unique HIV Case Inspires New Research

More than 34 million people live with HIV/AIDS worldwide but only one person may have been cured of the virus. We look at promising, genetic research that is aimed at replicating this apparent cure.

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Arrow Gobies, Ghost Shrimp and Bubble Snails: Teachers Explore the Unique Biodiversity of San Francisco Bay

Arrow Gobies, Ghost Shrimp and Bubble Snails: Teachers Explore the Unique Biodiversity of San Francisco Bay

Dedicated teachers spend a week of their summer vacation delving into science, climate change, and San Francisco Bay ecology.

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Hope for an Anti-Nicotine Vaccine

Hope for an Anti-Nicotine Vaccine

Recent research shows that a new vaccine led to consistently high anti-nicotine antibody levels that prevented nicotine from reaching the brain. If these findings are confirmed in people, this vaccine could be an effective therapy to help prevent nicotine addiction.

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Tracking Big Cats to Learn Their Secrets

Tracking Big Cats to Learn Their Secrets

Learning to see the landscape through the eyes of a wild carnivore helps Bay Area residents appreciate the essential ecological roles bobcats, mountain lions, and other predators play in ecosystems. New research shows that lion leftovers feed a surprising diversity of other species.

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Seeding Life Through the Universe

Seeding Life Through the Universe

Watching Prometheus the other day with my son got me to thinking about panspermia. This is the idea that life sometimes spreads through the universe by riding on interstellar flotsam and jetsam like meteors or asteroids.

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First Flight: Bald Eaglet Expected To Leave Lake Chabot Nest Soon

First Flight: Bald Eaglet Expected To Leave Lake Chabot Nest Soon

Hatched on Earth Day, expected to fledge on the Fourth of July, bald eagles are nesting at Lake Chabot. Find out the local story of our national symbol.

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Ocean Overrun With Gentle Gelatinous Salps

Ocean Overrun With Gentle Gelatinous Salps

What looks like a jellyfish but is closely related to humans? The answer is an oceanic animal called a salp, and right now the waters off California are teeming with unprecedented numbers of these creatures.

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Help the Sea On Your Next Overseas Vacation

Help the Sea On Your Next Overseas Vacation

If the chance to travel abroad and participate in an ongoing ocean research project sounds more appealing to you than poolside Mai Tais, here are seven sea-friendly ideas for your next vacation.

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People's Parks: Protecting Open Spaces for Everyone

People's Parks: Protecting Open Spaces for Everyone

Thanks to a novel partnership between California State Parks and the Sonoma County-based nonprofit LandPaths, nearly 3,400 acres of open space filled with old-growth redwood, Douglas fir and majestic oaks in the Willow Creek watershed of the Russian River are open to visitors for the price of an hour-long orientation.

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From Alvin to Robots: Deep Changes in Ocean Science

From Alvin to Robots: Deep Changes in Ocean Science

Ocean technology has come a long ways since the submersible Alvin made its first dive in 1964. Increasingly, scientists rely on robots, rather than manned subs like Alvin, to explore the earth's depths. But can remote-control exploration capture the thrill of science?

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Observing Life and Death in the CA Least Tern Colony

Observing Life and Death in the CA Least Tern Colony

Our scientific monitoring of the CA Least Tern nesting colony turned out to be more gripping than the best TV drama as we witnessed soaring action, villains and heroes, family ties, and death by predator all within the span of three hours.

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Bio-Robotics: Biology Goes High-Tech

Bio-Robotics: Biology Goes High-Tech

Meet "robo-squirrel." New technology in the emerging field of bio-robotics is helping biologists learn more about animal behavior.

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KQED Science Fan Spotlight

KQED Science Fan Spotlight

We'd like to share your stories about why you're passionate about science.

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Farmworkers Pay a Heavy Price for California's Bounty

Farmworkers Pay a Heavy Price for California's Bounty

California farmworkers work long days for about $7.50 an hour to pick fruit in orchards doused with nitrogen fertilizers. A UC Davis study released in March found that nitrates from fertilizers and dairy waste have contaminated groundwater supplies. Because farmworkers live near the fields they work in, they're at high risk for nitrate-contaminated drinking water.

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When Scientists Were Artists: The Royal Society's Picture Library Goes Digital

When Scientists Were Artists: The Royal Society's Picture Library Goes Digital

A hammerhead shark's baleful stare. A longnose batfish's fierce armor and delicate fins. These masterpieces of expression and scientific detail fill the pages of the world's first ichthyology book, De Historia Piscium, published in 1686 by the Royal Society.

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Tackling the Cause of Cystic Fibrosis One Mutation at a Time

Tackling the Cause of Cystic Fibrosis One Mutation at a Time

There was big news in the cystic fibrosis (CF) field recently: a new CF drug called ivacaftor (or VX-770 or Kalydeco) has been approved that does more than target the symptoms of CF. It actually works to get the broken gene working again. The good news is that this is the first treatment that has […]

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The Fungus Among Us Could Help Clean Oily Soil

The Fungus Among Us Could Help Clean Oily Soil

There’s more to fungi than just mushrooms. Buried in the soil live large fiber networks of fungi. And these fibrous microbes might be able to help clean up polluted soil.

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The Man Who Made California Safe for Mountain Lions

The Man Who Made California Safe for Mountain Lions

More than 40 years ago, Sen. John Dunlap (D-Napa) made conservation history when his mountain lion hunting moratorium passed the California Legislature and became law in 1971. He recalls the fight to pass the bill and his guiding principle, "when in doubt, preserve."

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Why Your Newfound Uniqueness is a Nightmare for Your Doctor

Why Your Newfound Uniqueness is a Nightmare for Your Doctor

A couple of new studies confirm what many of us have feared: each of us is surprisingly unique genetically. This is to be feared because of the impact it will have on the future of personalized medicine.

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