The Science of Sustainability

Biology

Beavers Return to San Jose

Beavers Return to San Jose

A family of beavers has taken up residence in the Guadalupe River, across from the HP Pavilion.

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Side Trips from Interstate 5: Great Valley Rivers and Grasslands

Side Trips from Interstate 5: Great Valley Rivers and Grasslands

It takes a million years to make a land this big and flat. Take a few hours to experience it.

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DNA Ancestry Tests: Simultaneously Powerful and Limited

DNA Ancestry Tests: Simultaneously Powerful and Limited

Don’t count on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) ancestry tests giving you a broad understanding of your own family history. They won’t.

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Navy Training Raises New Concerns for Whales off California Coast

Navy Training Raises New Concerns for Whales off California Coast

As the whale migration season reaches its peak, new concerns arise over naval training exercises off the California coast.

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Peregrine Falcon Chicks Hatch On Easter Sunday in San Jose

Peregrine Falcon Chicks Hatch On Easter Sunday in San Jose

Peregrine falcon nest cameras in San Francisco and San Jose have been giving citizens the unique chance to watch these animals up-close since 2005.

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Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley: Documenting the Poisoning of America’s Wetland

Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley: Documenting the Poisoning of America’s Wetland

In the new exhibition on display at Stanford's Cantor Arts Center, "Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach's Cancer Alley," the Berkeley photographer takes a hard look at the environmental consequences of our dependence on petroleum.

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Resurrection Biology: The Reality of Bringing Back Extinct Species

Resurrection Biology: The Reality of Bringing Back Extinct Species

There has been a lot of buzz of late about bringing back extinct species like mammoths or passenger pigeons. While it might be a good idea to start thinking about these possibilities, we are years or even decades away from being able to actually pull this off with most long dead animals. The problem isn’t […]

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Scientists Celebrate a Long-Dead Whale

Scientists Celebrate a Long-Dead Whale

Why is a rotting whale on the Antarctic seafloor exciting to geologists?

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Yes, Your Cell Phone Conversation Does Drive People Mad

Yes, Your Cell Phone Conversation Does Drive People Mad

It's well known that talking on your cell phone compromises your ability to perform simple tasks like walking and driving. Now it turns out cell phones impact cognition in bystanders as well: listening to another person talk on their cell phone isn't just incredibly annoying, it also interferes with your memory and concentration.

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Science on the SPOT: The Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz

Science on the SPOT: The Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz

More than a million visitors visit Alcatraz every year, but a recent discovery has revealed another attraction that lives within the shadows of this historic prison.

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Rescuing Injured Wildlife

Rescuing Injured Wildlife

Wild birds, injured on the beach, get a helping hand from dedicated staff and volunteers. Here's the story of one injured water bird.

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The Ant-Driven Landscape

The Ant-Driven Landscape

Invasive ant species have powerful—and poorly known—effects on a region's soil.

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Engineering a Virus-Free Future

Engineering a Virus-Free Future

I have been reading a book called "Regenesis" where in one part the authors propose a way to re-engineer the human race so all people are resistant to all viruses, known and unknown. This will theoretically be possible in the next few decades (or even sooner) and, if done right, is predicted to make us resistant for a very long time and possibly even forever.

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Comets May Have Delivered Life's Early Building Blocks

Comets May Have Delivered Life's Early Building Blocks

The building blocks of life on Earth may have originated in space.

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Arsenic and Old Wells

Arsenic and Old Wells

Six years after the EPA's new arsenic rule for drinking water went into effect, poor communities in the San Joaquin Valley—who can’t afford the costs of complying with the stricter standard—face the highest risk of exposure to unsafe arsenic levels.

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Two Species, One Nest: CuriOdyssey's Animal Odd Couple

Two Species, One Nest: CuriOdyssey's Animal Odd Couple

As spring approaches, an egret and a heron have been hard at work preparing for their future brood…together. This will mark the sixth year that "Jabby," a snowy egret (Egretta thula), and "Lefty," a black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) have nested as a pair at CuriOdyssey (formerly Coyote Point Museum) in San Mateo.

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Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive species are here and more are on the way! Find out about the problems and some possible solutions.

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Genetic Sleuthing, Or How To Catch The Right Identical Twin Criminal

Genetic Sleuthing, Or How To Catch The Right Identical Twin Criminal

There are unique DNA differences between identical twins that scientists can use to tell them apart. Why isn't law enforcement using these differences to catch their criminal? Because the cost is too high.

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The Science of Nudity: The Skinny on Showing Skin

The Science of Nudity: The Skinny on Showing Skin

News flash – as of February 1st, 2013 – public nudity is illegal in San Francisco. But well before the law went into effect, it generated a tremendous amount of debate.

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The Animal Kingdom's Otherworldly Ancestors

The Animal Kingdom's Otherworldly Ancestors

At one time, squishy invertebrates constituted most of the animal life on Earth, but about half a billion years ago, something remarkable happened: an evolutionary explosion known as the Cambrian Period.

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