The Science of Sustainability

Biology

Producers Notes: Cal Academy Butterfly Collection

Producers Notes: Cal Academy Butterfly Collection

Collections Manager Norman Penny gives Science on the SPOT a small peek at The Cal Academy’s vast butterfly collection.

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Science on the SPOT: Cal Academy Butterfly Collection

Science on the SPOT: Cal Academy Butterfly Collection

The California Academy of Sciences has the largest collection of biological reference materials west of the Mississippi River. Norman Penny, collections manager of the entomology department, gives QUEST viewers a peek at the academy's vast butterfly collection.

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Feeling Crabby? Dungeness Crab Season Is Upon Us

Feeling Crabby? Dungeness Crab Season Is Upon Us

Got Crabs? It's that time of year again for San Francisco’s favorite crustacean: the Dungeness crab.

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Migrating Monarch Butterflies Hunker Down in Monterey

Migrating Monarch Butterflies Hunker Down in Monterey

As you read this, monarch butterflies are arriving at their winter homes in Santa Cruz and Pacific Grove.

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Facts are Facts

Facts are Facts

Despite what you might read on the web (including in the comments section of this blog), herd immunity is real. There is an overwhelming amount of data out there to support the idea that it protects us from the diseases that used to sweep through our population. Herd immunity is a fact and therefore real whether you believe in it or not.

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5 DIY Tricks to Squash Bed Bugs

5 DIY Tricks to Squash Bed Bugs

Check out these five DIY options to help you put bed bugs to sleep once and for all.

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Newt Migration

Newt Migration

The newts are on the move again. Each fall, after the rains start, the newts of Berkeley’s Tilden Park start migrating from the woods to waters of Wildcat Creek, where they mate and lay their eggs. South Park Drive, popular with cyclists and Sunday drivers, crosses their migratory path. Each year from November 1 to April 1 the road is closed to cars, to prevent the newts from getting squished. (How did the newt cross the road? Not by being run over, that’s for sure.)

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Science on the SPOT: Fire and Butterflies

Science on the SPOT: Fire and Butterflies

Can fire save the endangered Mission Blue Butterfly? The Golden Gate National Recreation Area experiments with using controlled burns to improve habitat for this critically imperiled Bay Area native.

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Producer's Notes for  Science on the SPOT: Fire and Butterflies

Producer's Notes for Science on the SPOT: Fire and Butterflies

On a glorious sunny August morning I found myself in a parking lot in the Marin headlands attending in a pre-burn fire crew meeting.

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A National Expo of Science

A National Expo of Science

This past weekend, I was on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. with a notebook and a very good pair of walking shoes. I spent the weekend exploring the inaugural expo of the USA Science and Engineering Festival.

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Tracing Bad (and Dangerous) Internet Science

Tracing Bad (and Dangerous) Internet Science

A dangerous rumor has been spreading across the web that people with Rh negative blood are resistant or even immune to getting AIDS. They’re not. This is the “everyone is an expert” ethos of the web at its worst.

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When A Sanctuary Is No Longer A Sanctuary

When A Sanctuary Is No Longer A Sanctuary

All is not well in our national marine sanctuaries. This summer and fall there have been at least six ship strikes on whales in the Gulf of the Farallones, the Monterey Bay and near the Channel Island National Marine Sanctuaries.

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Spider Invaders

Spider Invaders

Spiders seem to be everywhere this fall. There are dozens of spider webs on my deck; each morning, I destroy a new web as I leave the house. It seems like every time I go outside, I wipe spider silk from my face. And it’s not just my yard—several of my friends have noticed lots of spiders recently, too. I wondered if we’re experiencing a bumper year for spiders, so I asked a few arachnologist friends about it.

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Producer's Notes for Science on the SPOT: Life on the Farallones

Producer's Notes for Science on the SPOT: Life on the Farallones

The Farallon Islands off the coast of California are a vital home to many birds and marine mammals. See what life is like for scientists working in this forbidding and inhospitable world.

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Diving in Cordell Bank

Diving in Cordell Bank

Over the past five days I have had the incredible experience of diving on a location few have ever had the opportunity: the Cordell Bank.

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Science on the SPOT: Life on the Farallones

Science on the SPOT: Life on the Farallones

The Farallon Islands off the coast of San Francisco are a vital home to many birds and marine mammals. QUEST visits the Farallones and sees what life is like for scientists working in this forbidding and inhospitable world.

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Backyard Mountain Lions

Backyard Mountain Lions

A few weeks ago, in the middle of the night, a mountain lion roamed the streets of Berkeley. The Berkeley Police deemed the mountain lion a threat to public safety, and, following protocol, shot it in a resident’s driveway. These policies make sense—and so does a mountain lion walking in streets of Berkeley, when you really think about it.

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Test Tube Baby Nobel Prize

Test Tube Baby Nobel Prize

Dr. Edwards recently received a Nobel Prize in medicine for figuring out how to fertilize an egg in a Petri dish. Huge social impact but was the science Nobel-worthy?

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Who's Your Daddy?

Who's Your Daddy?

What became clear to me at a recent meeting I attended is that most everyone is going to have his or her DNA read in the near future. Another thing that became obvious is that scientists aren’t doing enough thinking about what impact this will have on society.

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Scientists Work on New Artificial Kidney

Scientists Work on New Artificial Kidney

A UCSF scientists is leading a team of nearly forty scientists across the nation to develop the world’s first artificial implantable kidney.

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