The Science of Sustainability

Gabriela Quirós

Gabriela Quirós

Gabriela Quirós is a TV Producer for KQED Science & Environment. She started her journalism career in 1993 as a newspaper reporter in Costa Rica, where she grew up. She won two national reporting awards there for series on C-sections and organic agriculture, and developed a life-long interest in health reporting. She moved to the Bay Area in 1996 to study documentary filmmaking at the University of California-Berkeley, where she received master’s degrees in journalism and Latin American studies. She joined KQED as a TV producer when QUEST started in 2006 and has covered everything from Alzheimer’s to bee die-offs to dark energy. She has shared two regional Emmys, and four of her stories have been nominated for the award as well. Independent from her work on QUEST, she produced and directed the hour-long documentary Beautiful Sin for PBS, about the surprising story of how Costa Rica became the only country in the world to outlaw in-vitro fertilization.

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Gabriela Quirós's Latest Posts

Largest Solar Plant in the World Goes Through Last Test Before Opening

Largest Solar Plant in the World Goes Through Last Test Before Opening

The largest solar plant in the world – in California’s Mojave Desert – goes through its last test before opening, after a debate that pitted renewable energy against a threatened tortoise.

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Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Go behind the scenes with the scientists working to keep Lake Tahoe pristine and protect it for generations to come.

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Next Meal: Engineering Food

Next Meal: Engineering Food

Are the benefits of genetically engineered foods worth the risks? This half-hour QUEST Northern California special explores the pros and cons of genetically engineered crops, and what the future holds for research and regulations.

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SF Scientist Wins Nobel for Stem Cell Breakthrough

SF Scientist Wins Nobel for Stem Cell Breakthrough

Shinya Yamanaka, a stem cell researcher at the Gladstone Institutes and professor at the University of California, San Francisco, has won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine.

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Heat and Harvest – the documentary

Heat and Harvest – the documentary

A half-hour documentary on how climate change is challenging California’s $30 billion agricultural industry. Co-produced by KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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Some Bugs Like it Hot: Climate Change and Agricultural Pests

Some Bugs Like it Hot: Climate Change and Agricultural Pests

Scientists and farmers are starting to notice that, as California's winters warm up, the state is becoming more hospitable to destructive agricultural pests.

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What's Next for Nuclear?

What's Next for Nuclear?

Can nuclear power be produced safely and affordably? A scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, is working to do just that.

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The Science of Riding a Bicycle

The Science of Riding a Bicycle

Their basic design hasn’t changed much, but scientists still don’t fully understand the forces that allow humans to balance atop a bicycle. QUEST visits Davis – a city that loves its bicycles – to take a ride on a research bike and explore a collection of antique bicycles.

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Childhood Obesity: Kids Fight Back

Childhood Obesity: Kids Fight Back

One in six kids in the United States is obese, a condition that doubles their risk of heart disease. Lorena Ramos, 14, a patient at the Healthy Hearts clinic at Children's Hospital Oakland struggles to lose weight. Will she succeed?

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Rushing to Save Heart Attack Patients

Rushing to Save Heart Attack Patients

By rushing heart attack victims to the operating table and opening their blocked arteries while their heart attacks are underway, doctors are now able to save 95% of those who make it to the hospital.

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Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report

Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report

This half-hour program looks at heart disease – the number one killer in the United States – from the point of view of a teenager trying to lower her risk, a heart attack survivor, and a scientist working to rebuild damaged hearts.

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Science on the SPOT: New Hope for Heart Repair

Science on the SPOT: New Hope for Heart Repair

Scientists in San Francisco have coaxed mouse hearts to repair themselves from within.The breakthrough could lead to treatments for 5 million people in the United States whose hearts were damaged after they survived heart attacks.

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Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Meet one of the three winners of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Lawrence Berkeley Lab astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter. He explains how dark energy, which makes up 70 percent of the universe, is causing our universe to expand.

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Science on the SPOT: Bats Beneath Us

Science on the SPOT: Bats Beneath Us

Every summer, 250,000 bats take up residence under a freeway bridge in California's Central Valley. And each night, they exit the bridge in a stunning ribbon-like formation.

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Science on the SPOT: Green Eggs By The Gram – Sustainable Caviar

Science on the SPOT: Green Eggs By The Gram – Sustainable Caviar

Once an exotic product associated with royalty and overfishing, caviar is now being farmed sustainably right here in California.

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Millie Hughes-Fulford: Scientist in Space

Millie Hughes-Fulford: Scientist in Space

As the space shuttle program comes to an end, QUEST profiles Marin County former astronaut Millie Hughes-Fulford.

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Science on the SPOT: Journey of the San Francisco Bay Trail

Science on the SPOT: Journey of the San Francisco Bay Trail

A dedicated group of outdoor lovers and trail planners is working to build a 500-mile trail around San Francisco Bay. Come along as QUEST hikes and bikes the newest section.

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Redwoods and Climate Change

Redwoods and Climate Change

QUEST follows a group of UC Berkeley scientists to the top of a 320-foot redwood in Mendocino County. Only 5 percent of these ancient redwoods survived our voracious desire for their hardy and plentiful wood. Now scientists are trying to predict how the remaining ones and their descendants might fare in the face of climate change in the decades to come.

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Producer's Notes: Angst in the Redwoods

Producer's Notes: Angst in the Redwoods

Even circus workers have safety nets. The folks who climb giant redwoods don’t.

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Bats In Our Midst

Bats In Our Midst

QUEST ventures under a Central Valley bridge to count the bats that make it their home. The bridge is one of the most important roosting places for Mexican free-tailed bats in the Central Valley, where this voracious insect-eating species protects the local crops from pests. Then meet two volunteers who take injured bats into their homes and nurse them to health.

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