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Diversity in the Valley: The NewME Accelerator (Part One)

Diversity in the Valley: The NewME Accelerator (Part One)

If you look around Silicon Valley, ideas all seem to be coming from the same kind of people. By a recent estimate, one percent of technology entrepreneurs were African American. Only eight percent of companies were founded by women. One program aims to change this by encouraging more women and minorities to launch companies.

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Energy-Saving Windows Get Smarter

Energy-Saving Windows Get Smarter

Buildings are responsible for 40% of the country’s energy use. So, researchers are trying improve our energy efficiency by making windows dynamic and intelligent.

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California's Deadlocked Delta: Is Carbon Farming the Future?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Is Carbon Farming the Future?

California’s Delta has a rich agricultural legacy, but farming there can be a risky business. Dozens of farms have been flooded over the past half century as aging levees have collapsed. Now, scientists are encouraging farmers to switch to a new crop. Instead of growing vegetables, they’d grow something that has all but disappeared in the Delta: wetlands.

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California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Delta is a far cry from what it once was. About 97% of its historic marshes have been lost and scientists aren’t quite sure what the Delta once looked like. Now, a Bay Area group is working to reconstruct it through ecological detective work.

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California's Deadlocked Delta: Can it Be Fixed?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can it Be Fixed?

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta has been the subject of a decades-long water war, but most Californians have never heard of it. Why is it so important? And can the state ever break the water deadlock?

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Life on The Gate: Working on the Golden Gate Bridge 1933-37

Life on The Gate: Working on the Golden Gate Bridge 1933-37

This year marks the 75th anniversary of an icon. When it opened in 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge was the longest suspension bridge ever built, constructed in one of the world’s most challenging settings. For the men who poured the concrete, and drove in each iron rivet, it was a life-changing experience.

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A Happy, Noisy Mess: Community Science Workshops Take Root in California

A Happy, Noisy Mess: Community Science Workshops Take Root in California

One Bay Area man brings "hands-on" science to low-income neighborhoods.

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Is Anyone Out There?

Is Anyone Out There?

Planet hunters enter a new phase in their search for extra solar planets and alien life.

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The Political Firestorm Inside Your Sofa

The Political Firestorm Inside Your Sofa

To comply with California law, furniture makers treat the foam in cushions with flame-retardant chemicals, up to two pounds of chemicals in an average-sized sofa. Those chemicals can turn up in household dust, blood, and breast milk. But efforts to remove them have been blocked by the chemical industry.

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Changing Foghorns

Changing Foghorns

Lightkeeper Peter Berkhout takes QUEST radio reporter Craig Miller to see a genuine rarity: one of perhaps two or three remaining vintage foghorns anywhere in the U.S. that’s still in working order.

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The Salmon are Back! (But Why?)

The Salmon are Back! (But Why?)

Biologists say more than 800,000 Sacramento Chinook are off the coast right now. It’s the biggest number they've seen since 2005.

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Feds Pay For Out-of-the-Box Energy Ideas

Feds Pay For Out-of-the-Box Energy Ideas

Did you know the federal government has a clean tech venture fund? QUEST talks with the head of the program, ARPA- E, about some potentially transformational energy ideas.

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Tsunami Program Faces Cuts One Year After Disaster

Tsunami Program Faces Cuts One Year After Disaster

Just one year after the disaster in Japan, proposed budget cuts could impact the US tsunami warning program.

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Lone Wolf’s Historic Trek Provokes Questions and Concerns

Lone Wolf’s Historic Trek Provokes Questions and Concerns

OR7, the lone gray wolf from a pack in Oregon, crossed back into his home state yesterday after two months of wandering in Northern California. With OR7’s arrival, California has been thrown into a national debate about how to manage wolves.

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Eavesdropping on the Heart: A Patient’s Campaign for Access

Eavesdropping on the Heart: A Patient’s Campaign for Access

You could call it a sort of Silicon Valley approach to health: Campos has had his genome sequenced; he sleeps with a sleep monitor, and goes nowhere without his pedometer. He wants the same access to the information coming out of his own heart.

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Up All Night on NASA's Flying Telescope

Up All Night on NASA's Flying Telescope

The Obama Administration’s new budget for NASA was released last week, and calls for cuts to many space programs. But one California-based project is likely to get more money. The SOFIA flying observatory, a telescope mounted on an airplane, is considered more nimble and cost-effective than other projects. Reporter Lauren Sommer recently caught a ride as it flew over the Pacific Ocean.

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Building Better Roads with Next Generation Pavement

Building Better Roads with Next Generation Pavement

A third of Bay Area roads are in poor condition and funding is dwindling on the state and federal level. That’s something Congress is discussing in Washington this week. Meanwhile, researchers at two University of California campuses are trying to find ways to stretch those sparse dollars, by making pavement quieter, greener and more durable.

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The Bay Area's National Park Expands South

The Bay Area's National Park Expands South

The addition of Rancho Corral de Tierra is historic, "the largest land acquisition for Golden Gate National Recreation Area pretty much since it began."

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Surgeons Seek Kid-Sized Tools for the Operating Room

Surgeons Seek Kid-Sized Tools for the Operating Room

If you’ve ever spent time in Silicon Valley or among hi-tech entrepreneurs, you may have heard the term “Valley of Death.” It’s used to describe the huge gulf that can exist between coming up with a new idea, and getting a product to market. Well, this is a real problem in hospitals, too. Especially when it comes to kids.

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California Pushes to Get Clean Cars on the Road

California Pushes to Get Clean Cars on the Road

California officials are considering the toughest regulations in the country to promote sales of cars powered by batteries, hydrogen fuel cells or other technology that produces little or no air pollution. These kind of tough mandates have been tried before but they failed. So is this finally the right time for the clean car?

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