The Science of Sustainability

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Dating Drought in the Nebraska Sandhills

Dating Drought in the Nebraska Sandhills

Could the Nebraska Sandhills resemble the Sahara? They have before. Join QUEST as we explore dating and recreating drought in dunes.

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Local Farmer Sets His Sights on a New Crop: Crickets

Local Farmer Sets His Sights on a New Crop: Crickets

Insect protein is all the buzz lately, and for good reason — it doesn’t require many resources to produce. Now one urban farmer in Ohio wants to cash in on that trend.

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Shrimp from Wisconsin? New Aquatic Farming Methods Are Making It Possible

Shrimp from Wisconsin? New Aquatic Farming Methods Are Making It Possible

High-quality, high-protein, and healthy shrimp are being grown indoors in Wisconsin, far from the seashore.

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Fire Returns to The Great Plains

Fire Returns to The Great Plains

Fire can be dangerous, but it's not always a bad thing. On the Great Plains, firefighters, ecologists, and ranchers are slowly trying to make fire a part of the region's ecosystem again.

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The Skin of a Building and Why it Matters

The Skin of a Building and Why it Matters

Retrofitting the “skin” of an older building can save energy and money. Climb inside one company’s test chamber with QUEST Ohio to find out more.

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How to Plant a Backyard Rain Garden

How to Plant a Backyard Rain Garden

This growing season, consider planting a different kind of garden, one that will sop up stormwater and take pressure off the sewage system.

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Drought Risk Atlas Uses Past to Predict Future: A Q&A with Climatologist Mark Svoboda

Drought Risk Atlas Uses Past to Predict Future: A Q&A with Climatologist Mark Svoboda

A new tool promises to help decision makers and the public better understand and prepare for future drought.

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Ho-Chunk Nation Promotes Native Edible Plants

Ho-Chunk Nation Promotes Native Edible Plants

Bill Greendeer has been letting indigenous plants return to his farm in southwest Wisconsin. The native plants are abundant and edible.

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Repairing the Land After Frac Sand is Removed

Repairing the Land After Frac Sand is Removed

In Wisconsin, sand that’s perfect for hydraulic fracturing is being mined faster than ever before. But what will the land look like after the rush ends?

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Getting Up Close with Cranes

Getting Up Close with Cranes

For decades, scientists have studied the annual migration of sandhill cranes through central Nebraska. A new project is using time-lapse cameras to capture and study crane behavior.

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Vacant Lots Get a Green Makeover

Vacant Lots Get a Green Makeover

Vacant lots are a big problem for cities with population loss, like Cleveland, where researchers are testing a cost-efficient way to transform abandoned land into spaces that revitalize neighborhoods and improve the environment.

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Dredging Up a Problem

Dredging Up a Problem

The Cuyahoga River in northeast Ohio — known for catching fire in the 1960s — relies on frequent dredging to keep the shipping channels open. Now a controversial new proposal to dump the dredged material into Lake Erie has residents worried about contamination of the public water supply.

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The Science of Measuring Snow

The Science of Measuring Snow

Much of the water flowing through the West starts as snowpack high up in the mountains. A complex system of remote and manual data collection helps water managers calculate how much water they'll have for the season ahead.

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Getting the Munchies for Hemp

Getting the Munchies for Hemp

More people are turning to hemp seeds as a source of healthy fats and protein, and as a sustainable crop.

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During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

As California's drought gets worse, farmers and conservationists are teaming up to create temporary wetlands for birds migrating on the Pacific Flyway.

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In Dry Year, California Looks to Cloud Seeding

In Dry Year, California Looks to Cloud Seeding

There’s no doubt about it – it’s dry out there. 2013 ended as the driest year ever recorded in many parts of California. So water managers are trying to squeeze out every last drop with an old technology: cloud seeding.

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Why a Dark Sky Matters

Why a Dark Sky Matters

Big city lights may put some dazzle in the night sky, but they also cause problems for people and other creatures attuned to darkness.

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Reconstructing a River for Wildlife

Reconstructing a River for Wildlife

Pulling up vegetation, starting fires, and letting animals graze on riverbanks are just some of the steps being taken to improve habitat for migrating birds, including endangered species.

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Turning Contaminated Sites Into Wildlife Refuges

Turning Contaminated Sites Into Wildlife Refuges

One of the nation’s biggest wildlife refuges used to be a hotbed of military weapons production, and resulting contamination. It’s now been cleaned up and restored as an urban habitat refuge.

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“The Vine That Ate the South” Heads North

“The Vine That Ate the South” Heads North

The invasive vine known as kudzu has twined itself into Southern culture, but it’s a big environmental headache, causing crop and property damage and loss of biodiversity. And now the vine’s coming north.

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