The Science of Sustainability

Science on the SPOT: Restoring San Francisco's Lost Manzanita

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pdf Restoring San Francisco’s Lost Manzanita Educator Guide ( pdf ) A resource for using QUEST video in the classroom.

With their reddish bark and bell-shaped flowers, manzanitas are among California's iconic plants, adapted to the state's many ecosystems. One of the two manzanitas that grew exclusively in San Francisco's foggy climate, the Franciscana, was thought to have gone extinct in the wild until it was rediscovered in 2009. QUEST explores how the San Francisco Botanical Garden is toiling to give one of the city's rarest native plants a second chance.

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Category: Biology, Environment

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Gabriela Quirós

About the Author ()

Gabriela Quirós is a TV Producer for KQED Science & Environment. She started her journalism career in 1993 as a newspaper reporter in Costa Rica, where she grew up. She won two national reporting awards there for series on C-sections and organic agriculture, and developed a life-long interest in health reporting. She moved to the Bay Area in 1996 to study documentary filmmaking at the University of California-Berkeley, where she received master’s degrees in journalism and Latin American studies. She joined KQED as a TV producer when QUEST started in 2006 and has covered everything from Alzheimer’s to bee die-offs to dark energy. She has shared two regional Emmys, and four of her stories have been nominated for the award as well. Independent from her work on QUEST, she produced and directed the hour-long documentary Beautiful Sin for PBS, about the surprising story of how Costa Rica became the only country in the world to outlaw in-vitro fertilization.