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New Research into Disappearing Bees

New Research into Disappearing Bees

In 2006, the world learned that honeybees in America and Canada were dying in large numbers, and hives were becoming defunct. Five years later, what have scientists learned about the causes of Colony Collapse Disorder?

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Why I Do Science: Kandis Elliot

Why I Do Science: Kandis Elliot

Kandis Elliot is on the Botany Department staff at the University of Wisconsin, but she's not a scientist or professor. Elliot is an artist and transforms mere photographs of plants into lush, painterly artworks that educate as well as captivate.

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The Juno Mission: Interview With NASA Scientist Dr. Bill Cooke

The Juno Mission: Interview With NASA Scientist Dr. Bill Cooke

What's old, is new again. Dr. Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, discusses how the historical astro-photographic plates at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) contribute to the new Juno mission to Jupiter.

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Exoskeletons Walk Forward

Exoskeletons Walk Forward

An exoskeleton suit may seem like science fiction, turning ordinary humans into super heroes, but wearable robots are moving forward into reality.

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Growing Skin

Growing Skin

Biomedical researchers are investigating ways to 'grow' new skin in hopes that healing burns can be quicker, safer and more complete.

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Why I Do Science: Danielle Reed

Why I Do Science: Danielle Reed

If you can't abide Brussels sprouts and broccoli, your genes may be to blame. Geneticist Danielle Reed of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia studies differences in our perception of taste and smell. A small blip in DNA might determine if you're bitter blind or have a sweet tooth.

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Science on the SPOT: Resurrecting the Dead

Science on the SPOT: Resurrecting the Dead

QUEST travels to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History to meet Linda Spurlock, an anatomist and forensic reconstruction artist who uses clay to re-construct the faces of ancient humans in order to show what they looked like when alive. She also sketches more recently deceased people using only their remains in order to help police solve crimes.

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Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big Fixes for Big Quakes

Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big Fixes for Big Quakes

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is hard at work on a $4.6 billion, decade-long construction project to overhaul the Hetch Hetchy water system, which delivers water from the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park and five local reservoirs to 2.5 million residents in the Bay Area.

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Your Photos on QUEST: Mike Forsberg

Your Photos on QUEST: Mike Forsberg

Mike Forsberg, a nationally renowned photographer, conservationist, and author from Nebraska, spent four years traveling 100,000 miles across the Great Plains—from North Dakota to Texas—to create a portrait of under-appreciated species and habitats of what many consider “flyover country.”

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The Night Sky: Past and Present

The Night Sky: Past and Present

For more than 150 years, scientists have captured images of celestial objects scattered across the night sky. The Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute in North Carolina is attempting to save those historical records before they vanish into a black hole.

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Asian Carp: Threat to Great Lakes

Asian Carp: Threat to Great Lakes

The invasive Asian carp has wreaked havoc in the Mississippi River system. The voracious plankton eaters have out-competed native fish and have become the dominant species in many locations. If the carp reach the Great Lakes, they pose a threat to its $7 billion fishery, so a battle against them is taking place on many fronts.

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Cool Critters: Lake Erie Water Snake

Cool Critters: Lake Erie Water Snake

Within and along the waters of Lake Erie (one of the five Great Lakes), there is a daily struggle for survival between natives and unwelcomed invasive species.

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Science on the SPOT: The Science of Salt Glaze Pottery

Science on the SPOT: The Science of Salt Glaze Pottery

The art and science of salt glaze pottery requires skills and techniques acquired over generations of trial and error. Ben Owen III combines his family’s experiential knowledge of ceramics and additional scientific knowledge to create and improve his unique works of art.

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Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Meet one of the three winners of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Lawrence Berkeley Lab astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter. He explains how dark energy, which makes up 70 percent of the universe, is causing our universe to expand.

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One Fish Two Fish: Monitoring Marine Protected Areas

One Fish Two Fish: Monitoring Marine Protected Areas

QUEST takes to the high seas with researchers Dirk Rosen, James Lindholm and their crew to study the underwater world off the California coast. In recent years, the state has established a network of marine protected areas to help fragile habitats and struggling fish populations bounce back. But are they working?

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QUEST Lab: Engineering Fire

QUEST Lab: Engineering Fire

In a dark lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, engineers and mathematicians are developing new burners and studying different flames in hopes of better understanding the power of fire and how to make the most efficient flame possible.

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Induced Seismicity: Man-Made Earthquakes

Induced Seismicity: Man-Made Earthquakes

In California, more renewable energy comes from geothermal energy than solar and wind, combined. Today, a new technology known as Enhanced Geothermal Systems has the potential to extract even more heat and consequently energy to power steam turbines, but it’s not without challenges.

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QUEST Lab: The Shaking Table at UC Berkeley

QUEST Lab: The Shaking Table at UC Berkeley

Khalid Mosalam and his colleagues at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center's Shaking Table Laboratory are helping to make communities safer in an earthquake.

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Megathrust Earthquakes

Megathrust Earthquakes

Experts warn that an offshore quake powerful enough to kill thousands and discharge a tsunami could hit the West Coast any time. QUEST Northwest talks with geologists and seismologists about cutting-edge research in earthquake prediction, and what it would look like if the next “Big One" hits close to home.

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Airborne Wind Energy

Airborne Wind Energy

On the windswept tarmac of the former Alameda Naval Air Station, an inventive group of scientists and engineers are test-flying a kite-like tethered wing that may someday help revolutionize clean-energy. QUEST explores the potential of wind energy and new airborne wind turbines designed to harness the stronger and more consistent winds found at higher altitudes.

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