The Science of Sustainability

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Cementing a More Sustainable Future

Cementing a More Sustainable Future

A team of innovative students at UNC Charlotte develop a game-changing material poised to improve the way we build our cities and our homes.

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Fighting Food Waste

Fighting Food Waste

Forty percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes uneaten. From "farm to fork", there are many reasons for food waste, including consumer demand for perfect produce and confusion over expiration dates printed on packaged foods. This massive waste occurs as one in six Americans struggles with hunger every day, even in affluent regions such as Silicon Valley.

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Battling the Bloom:  Lake Erie

Battling the Bloom: Lake Erie

Millions depend on Lake Erie for drinking water, business, and recreation. Toxic algae blooms put all of this at risk, and now researchers are trying to identify the cause and craft solutions.

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Stanford Students Debut Solar-Powered Prefab Home

Stanford Students Debut Solar-Powered Prefab Home

Stanford University students set out to revolutionize home design by entering a solar powered prefab house into the Department of Energy's biennial Solar Decathlon competition.

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Meet the Natives: Wild Bees

Meet the Natives: Wild Bees

The United States is home to some 4,000 native bee species. In this video, entomologist Claudio Gratton explores whether these wild pollinators can keep agriculture buzzing as honeybee populations struggle to survive.

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Penguin Sentinels

Penguin Sentinels

In this short video, we travel with conservation biologist Dee Boersma to the Galapagos Islands where she works to support a population of temperate penguins that are being impacted by climate change.

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Next Meal: Engineering Food

Next Meal: Engineering Food

Are the benefits of genetically engineered foods worth the risks? This half-hour QUEST Northern California special explores the pros and cons of genetically engineered crops, and what the future holds for research and regulations.

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Science on the SPOT: The Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz

Science on the SPOT: The Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz

More than a million visitors visit Alcatraz every year, but a recent discovery has revealed another attraction that lives within the shadows of this historic prison.

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Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

UC Berkeley's University Herbarium boasts one of the largest and oldest collections of seaweed in the United States. Herbarium curator Kathy Ann Miller is leading a massive project to preserve digitally nearly 80,000 specimens of west coast seaweed.

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Science on the SPOT: Shadows and Spiders– A Secret Cave in California

Science on the SPOT: Shadows and Spiders– A Secret Cave in California

The rural foothills along the Santa Cruz County Coast hold an ancient secret. Deep below the redwoods, White Moon Cave extends for nearly a mile — making it one of the longest caves in California. But few people have ever been in it. Join the KQED Science team as we squeeze through the narrow clandestine entrance, and meet the uncanny cave inhabitants to bring new light to this hidden realm.

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Why I Do Science: Stephen Palumbi

Why I Do Science: Stephen Palumbi

In this edition of "Why I Do Science", we hear from Stephen Palumbi, a world-renowned marine biologist and director of the Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove, California.

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Heat and Harvest – the documentary

Heat and Harvest – the documentary

A half-hour documentary on how climate change is challenging California’s $30 billion agricultural industry. Co-produced by KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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Some Bugs Like it Hot: Climate Change and Agricultural Pests

Some Bugs Like it Hot: Climate Change and Agricultural Pests

Scientists and farmers are starting to notice that, as California's winters warm up, the state is becoming more hospitable to destructive agricultural pests.

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Uncool Cherries

Uncool Cherries

Climate change is contributing to reduced cherry yields in California. This video is part of the Heat and Harvest series, co-produced by KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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Dry and Salted

Dry and Salted

Salty groundwater is ruining almond crops in the Central Valley, and scientists expect sea level rise to worsen the problem. This video is part of the Heat and Harvest series, co-produced by KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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Black Holes: Objects of Attraction

Black Holes: Objects of Attraction

Black holes have been the stuff of science fiction since their discovery in the late sixties. But now a new, nimble NASA telescope is using its powerful x-ray vision to hunt for these abundant yet invisible, massive space oddities.

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Your Videos on QUEST: Steve Fyffe

Your Videos on QUEST: Steve Fyffe

Motion-activated cameras at Stanford University's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve provide scientists a window into the secret lives of the animals there. This short video by the Stanford News Service reveals how these "camera traps" work and shows some of the amazing animals that roam around Jasper Ridge at night.

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What's Next for Nuclear?

What's Next for Nuclear?

Can nuclear power be produced safely and affordably? A scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, is working to do just that.

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Field Notes: Dan Costa in Antarctica

Field Notes: Dan Costa in Antarctica

QUEST Producer Sheraz Sadiq interviews Bay Area filmmaker and musician Jesse Hiatt about the experience of filming in one of the world's most extreme environments. His breathtaking footage was edited into the QUEST segment, "Field Notes: Dan Costa in Antarctica."

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X-ray Microscope: Seeing Cells in 3-D

X-ray Microscope: Seeing Cells in 3-D

At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scientists are using a cutting-edge microscope, the first of its kind in the world, to image whole cells in 3-D with the penetrating power of x-rays. The new images generated by the microscope are offering a deeper, more precise understanding of cellular structures and how they change with diseases.

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