The Science of Sustainability

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After the Frack

After the Frack

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a process of extracting natural gas that creates large amounts of contaminated wastewater. QUEST travels to Ohio to investigate how this wastewater is produced and the controversy over how to safely dispose of it.

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A River Returns

A River Returns

In Washington state, a river once known for its abundant salmon run is getting a second chance. The Elwha River dams, which decimated salmon populations and profoundly altered the ecosystem, are coming down and hopes are high that salmon will return.

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Using Social Media to Rescue Food

Using Social Media to Rescue Food

In the U.S., more than 30 million tons of food end up in landfills each year. The food waste occurs throughout the food chain, from farm to table. But now social media is being mobilized to rescue surplus food and keep it from going to waste.

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Restoring Oyster Reefs

Restoring Oyster Reefs

In this video, scientists wade through marshes along North Carolina’s coast on a mission to restore oyster reefs, which are critical to the health of our marine ecosystems.

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QUEST TV: Restoring America's Waters

QUEST TV: Restoring America's Waters

Explore efforts to rebuild oyster reefs, battle algae blooms, and restore salmon to a dammed river in this television episode.

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QUEST TV: From Farm to Fork to Fuel

QUEST TV: From Farm to Fork to Fuel

Explore an urban farm, new ways to reduce food waste, and how cooking grease can be turned into biofuel in this television episode.

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Biodiesel Power

Biodiesel Power

From the deep fryer to the fuel tank, how one North Carolina company is using cooking grease to power a community.

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An Oasis Grows in an Urban Food Desert

An Oasis Grows in an Urban Food Desert

In this video we meet former pro-basketball player and MacArthur “genius” award winner Will Allen, and explore the Milwaukee farm where he successfully cultivates food, including fish, to feed thousands of people.

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Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Go behind the scenes with the scientists working to keep Lake Tahoe pristine and protect it for generations to come.

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Cementing a More Sustainable Future

Cementing a More Sustainable Future

A team of innovative students at UNC Charlotte develop a game-changing material poised to improve the way we build our cities and our homes.

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Fighting Food Waste

Fighting Food Waste

Forty percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes uneaten. From "farm to fork", there are many reasons for food waste, including consumer demand for perfect produce and confusion over expiration dates printed on packaged foods. This massive waste occurs as one in six Americans struggles with hunger every day, even in affluent regions such as Silicon Valley.

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Battling the Bloom:  Lake Erie

Battling the Bloom: Lake Erie

Millions depend on Lake Erie for drinking water, business, and recreation. Toxic algae blooms put all of this at risk, and now researchers are trying to identify the cause and craft solutions.

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Stanford Students Debut Solar-Powered Prefab Home

Stanford Students Debut Solar-Powered Prefab Home

Stanford University students set out to revolutionize home design by entering a solar powered prefab house into the Department of Energy's biennial Solar Decathlon competition.

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Meet the Natives: Wild Bees

Meet the Natives: Wild Bees

The United States is home to some 4,000 native bee species. In this video, entomologist Claudio Gratton explores whether these wild pollinators can keep agriculture buzzing as honeybee populations struggle to survive.

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Penguin Sentinels

Penguin Sentinels

In this short video, we travel with conservation biologist Dee Boersma to the Galapagos Islands where she works to support a population of temperate penguins that are being impacted by climate change.

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Next Meal: Engineering Food

Next Meal: Engineering Food

Are the benefits of genetically engineered foods worth the risks? This half-hour QUEST Northern California special explores the pros and cons of genetically engineered crops, and what the future holds for research and regulations.

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Science on the SPOT: The Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz

Science on the SPOT: The Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz

More than a million visitors visit Alcatraz every year, but a recent discovery has revealed another attraction that lives within the shadows of this historic prison.

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Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

UC Berkeley's University Herbarium boasts one of the largest and oldest collections of seaweed in the United States. Herbarium curator Kathy Ann Miller is leading a massive project to preserve digitally nearly 80,000 specimens of west coast seaweed.

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Science on the SPOT: Shadows and Spiders– A Secret Cave in California

Science on the SPOT: Shadows and Spiders– A Secret Cave in California

The rural foothills along the Santa Cruz County Coast hold an ancient secret. Deep below the redwoods, White Moon Cave extends for nearly a mile — making it one of the longest caves in California. But few people have ever been in it. Join the KQED Science team as we squeeze through the narrow clandestine entrance, and meet the uncanny cave inhabitants to bring new light to this hidden realm.

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Why I Do Science: Stephen Palumbi

Why I Do Science: Stephen Palumbi

In this edition of "Why I Do Science", we hear from Stephen Palumbi, a world-renowned marine biologist and director of the Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove, California.

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