The Science of Sustainability

Bats In Our Midst

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QUEST ventures under a Central Valley bridge to count the bats that make it their home. The bridge is one of the most important roosting places for Mexican free-tailed bats in the Central Valley, where this voracious insect-eating species protects the local crops from pests. Then meet two volunteers who take injured bats into their homes and nurse them to health.

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Category: Biology, Environment, Television

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Gabriela Quirós

About the Author ()

Gabriela Quirós is a TV Producer for KQED Science & Environment. She started her journalism career in 1993 as a newspaper reporter in Costa Rica, where she grew up. She won two national reporting awards there for series on C-sections and organic agriculture, and developed a life-long interest in health reporting. She moved to the Bay Area in 1996 to study documentary filmmaking at the University of California-Berkeley, where she received master’s degrees in journalism and Latin American studies. She joined KQED as a TV producer when QUEST started in 2006 and has covered everything from Alzheimer’s to bee die-offs to dark energy. She has shared two regional Emmys, and four of her stories have been nominated for the award as well. Independent from her work on QUEST, she produced and directed the hour-long documentary Beautiful Sin for PBS, about the surprising story of how Costa Rica became the only country in the world to outlaw in-vitro fertilization.
  • Gabriela Quiros

    Here's an excellent article on white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed 1 million bats, mostly little brown bats, in the eastern United States:

    http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/333675/title/Helping_Bats_Hold_On

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bozo-de-Niro/100000502819648 Bozo de Niro

    I would like to see more about the bridge and its reconstruction, and how its 'redwood boxes' and 'concrete troughs' can emulate the properties of a cave. Just how the crevices of wood and concrete that were shown can produce the properties a 'bat cave' isn't clear. It needs camera work and videography that can reveal the internals of the bridge and its conceptual internal design before, during, and after its reconstruction and habitation. Without the right kind of camera work and videography, it'll remain hard to appreciate how mere 'narrow crevices of wood and concrete' can add up to the properties of a valuable and working bat cave … and would likely draw a wider PBS audience too — prolly from the same people who like to watch "Hometime" and "This Old House" — cuz figuratively and metaphorically speaking, a man cave and bat cave have a lot in common.