The Science of Sustainability

Tag: telescope

Celebrate Science with SETI this Summer

Celebrate Science with SETI this Summer

Learn more about SETI's mission and goals at this family friendly event on July 23rd.

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DIY Telescope Workshop at The Randall Museum

DIY Telescope Workshop at The Randall Museum

Learn to make your own telescope and take a whole new look at the night sky.

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Every Little Bit Counts

Every Little Bit Counts

Ever tried to count the stars in the sky on some clear, lazy night, or the kind that fall from the sky during a meteor shower? How about craters on the Moon, or distant galaxies in deep space? If you like this kind of work, there is a job for you! Several, in fact….

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Earth-Sized Planets Could Be Common

Earth-Sized Planets Could Be Common

The Earth may not be as unique as we think it is. That's according to findings announced today by UC Berkeley. Astronomers there believe that Earth-sized planets may be more abundant in the universe than previously thought.

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Spitzer Samples an Assortment of Asteroids

Spitzer Samples an Assortment of Asteroids

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed that asteroids may have more variety than once imagined.

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The Stars Are Coming Out Tonight!

The Stars Are Coming Out Tonight!

Looking to get out and enjoy the night sky? There are a variety of opportunities to go stargazing around the Bay Area whether or not you have a telescope!

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Northern California Scientists Helping Lead Project To Build World's Biggest Telescope

Northern California Scientists Helping Lead Project To Build World's Biggest Telescope

Scientists from the University of California are working to construct the largest telescope on Earth.

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The International Year of Astronomy

The International Year of Astronomy

2009 has been designated the International Year of Astronomy (IYA), in celebration of the 400th anniversary of Galileo first pointing the new invention of the telescope at the sky.

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Reporter's Notes: Exoplanets

Reporter's Notes: Exoplanets

Artistic rendition of exoplanet Gilese 436 b, created in Celestia In the past fifteen years, the search for other Earths– and possibly life– outside our own solar system has taken off. As of May 2008, 293 extrasolar planets have been confirmed. Most of these planets are big, gas giants like our own Jupiter but new […]

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Mountain-top telescopes and stars that don't twinkle

Mountain-top telescopes and stars that don't twinkle

Infrared image of a zebra from the London Zoo. Credit: Steve Lowe Right now I am very excited about the possibility of working on a new small telescope in southern Utah. This telescope was funded by a private donation and will be run by the University of Utah. We even found a mountain top in […]

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Pixels are so 20th century – say hello to 'spaxels'

Pixels are so 20th century – say hello to 'spaxels'

Making Every Photon Count Last week I went to a talk given by the leader of the Supernova Factory collaboration at LBNL. What is SN factory? This is an ambitious project to study supernovae like never before. I mentioned this project briefly in a previous post , now that they are so close to releasing […]

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Supernova Legacy

Supernova Legacy

Last night we completed our observations for the Supernova Legacy Survey. This was a five year program to study supernovae using a 4-meter telescope in Hawaii in combination with several of the largest optical telescopes in the world. The project was headed by a group at a university in Toronto and a group at a […]

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Producer's Notes – SETI: The New Search for ET

Producer's Notes – SETI: The New Search for ET

The Allen Telescope Array.When I first began to work on Quest's SETI: The Search for ET segment, I have to admit that my initial reaction was "are we still looking for ET?" Of course, humans have been gazing up to the heavens for millennia, asking ourselves that interminable question "are we alone?" And of course, […]

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Oakland's Observatory

Oakland's Observatory

The original Oakland Observatory in the 1880’s, at Lafayette Square in Oakland. Credit: Chabot Space & Science Center archives.This year marks an anniversary for the astronomical heritage of Oakland and the San Francisco Bay Area: Chabot Observatory turns 125! Originally established as the Oakland Observatory in 1883, the facility was a unique creature from the […]

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Nap time for the Sun: solar cycles

Nap time for the Sun: solar cycles

Extreme close-up of the Sun's visible surface, showing 'bubbling' cells of convecting gas–each the size of Northern California. credit: Hinode JAXA/NASA/PPARCBy all accounts, a new cycle-Cycle 24-in solar activity has begun… something you probably didn't notice since the beginning of a solar cycle is quite subtle…. First things first: what is a solar cycle, and […]

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Astronomy on the Wing

Astronomy on the Wing

More than meets the eye: The constellation Orion in visible light (left) and infrared (right) Visible light image: Akira Fujii; Infrared image: Infrared Astronomical SatelliteSome months ago my blog, "SOFIA: Fly By Night," talked about the up-and-coming astronomy ace of the night skies, SOFIA: the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy–a 2.5 meter infrared telescope built […]

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