The Science of Sustainability

Tag: redwoods

Redwoods and Climate Change

Redwoods and Climate Change

QUEST follows a group of UC Berkeley scientists to the top of a 320-foot redwood in Mendocino County. Only 5 percent of these ancient redwoods survived our voracious desire for their hardy and plentiful wood. Now scientists are trying to predict how the remaining ones and their descendants might fare in the face of climate change in the decades to come.

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Science on the SPOT: Banana Slugs Unpeeled

Science on the SPOT: Banana Slugs Unpeeled

One of the most beloved and iconic native species within the old growth redwood forests is the Pacific Banana Slug. QUEST goes on a hunt to find and introduce Ariolomax dolichophallus, a bright yellow slug with a big personality.

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Redwood Regeneration

Redwood Regeneration

QUEST has an inordinate fondness for albino redwoods. But after producing three videos, QUEST Producer Chris Bauer still had questions.

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Science on the SPOT: Revisiting Albino Redwoods, Biological Mystery

Science on the SPOT: Revisiting Albino Redwoods, Biological Mystery

UC Santa Cruz plant biologists study rare albino redwood trees to better understand the inner workings of these unusual plants. By learning how albino plants survive, they may unlock some of the mysteries of how redwood trees live.

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California's Redwoods Face Climate Change

California's Redwoods Face Climate Change

After a century of logging, California's old growth redwood forests are only a fraction of what they once were. Today, they remain a narrow coastal band that extends from Monterey Bay to the Oregon border. But redwoods are facing a new threat. As Lauren Sommer reports, scientists are trying to understand how these trees are responding to a changing climate.

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Science on the SPOT: Measuring Redwood Giants

Science on the SPOT: Measuring Redwood Giants

Forest ecologist Steve Sillett leads a team of scientists as they climb and measure every branch of the tallest old growth redwoods in California to study how they are being impacted by climate change.

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Albino Redwoods: Ghosts of the Forest

Albino Redwoods: Ghosts of the Forest

Park rangers in the Santa Cruz Mountains are protecting a decades-old secret: albino redwood trees. Pale and fragile, these so-called "ghost trees" are deliberately off the beaten track, as Amy Standen found out.

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Science on the SPOT: Science of Fog

Science on the SPOT: Science of Fog

San Francisco's fickle summer weather has earned it the nickname "Fog City." Science on the SPOT asks UC Berkeley's Todd Dawson to clear up the mysterious origins of this weather phenomenon, and share his research on how fog is integral to our state's ecology.

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Exploring Samuel P. Taylor State Park

Exploring Samuel P. Taylor State Park

Less than an hour’s drive north from San Francisco, the 2,882 acres of Samuel P. Taylor State Park is within easy driving distance of some of northern California’s most dramatic outdoor scenery. The park features a unique contrast of coastal redwood groves and open grassland.

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Tracking Raindrops

Tracking Raindrops

We all rely on the water cycle, but how does it really work? Scientists at UC Berkeley are embarking on a new project to understand how global warming is affecting our fresh water supply. And they're doing it by tracking individual raindrops in Mendocino and north of Lake Tahoe.

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The Right to Sunlight:  Solar vs. Redwood Trees

The Right to Sunlight: Solar vs. Redwood Trees

In Silicon Valley, a battle between neighbors has turned into a different kind of face off: solar energy versus trees. It turns out that growing redwood trees can actually be a crime in California, if they block solar panels… as one couple in Sunnyvale found out the hard way. David Gorn reports on a new […]

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Ladybug Pajama Party

Ladybug Pajama Party

Each year Ladybugs fly in by the millions to winter in the East Bay's Redwood Regional Park. We meet naturalist Linda Yemoto who explains this phenomenon. But how these beetles know where to go is still one of nature's mysteries.

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