The Science of Sustainability

Tag: sea lion

Sea Lions, Herring, and Climate Change

Sea Lions, Herring, and Climate Change

I thought I’d check in on the sea lions at Pier 39. Just a few years ago, there were about 1600 of them. Then in 2009, most of them swam away.

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Producer's Notes: The Great White Shark: Meet the Man in the Gray Suit

Producer's Notes: The Great White Shark: Meet the Man in the Gray Suit

Like many people, I'm fascinated with sharks. I can't remember a time when they did not interest me.

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Producer's Notes: The Farallon Islands—"California's Galapagos"

Producer's Notes: The Farallon Islands—"California's Galapagos"

Lying 28 miles off the coast of San Francisco, the jagged silhouette of the Farallon Islands disrupts the clean line of the horizon. This foreboding knot of rocks sits amid one of the most
productive marine food webs on the planet and hosts the largest seabird breeding colony in the continental United States. QUEST ventures out for a rare visit to learn what life is like on the islands and meet the scientists who call this incredibly wild place home.

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Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

For these notes, I thought I'd focus on something that didn’t make it into the sea lions radio broadcast: the necropsy. Each year the Marine Mammal Center treats somewhere between 600-1000 animals, including California sea lions, Pacific harbor seals, Northern elephant seals, and steller sea lions. About half of them are treated successfully at the […]

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Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

For these notes, I thought I'd focus on something that didn't make it into the sea lions radio broadcast: the necropsy.

Each year the Marine Mammal Center treats somewhere between 600-1000 animals, including California sea lions, Pacific harbor seals, Northern elephant seals, and steller sea lions. About half of them are treated successfully at the center and released into the Pacific. The other half either die naturally or have to be euthanized.

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