The Science of Sustainability

Tag: san francisco

Urban Farms in San Francisco Struggle to Put Down Roots

Urban Farms in San Francisco Struggle to Put Down Roots

Although urban agriculture is on the rise nationwide, in locavore-loving San Francisco, some difficult challenges are emerging

Continue Reading

The Science of Nudity: The Skinny on Showing Skin

The Science of Nudity: The Skinny on Showing Skin

News flash – as of February 1st, 2013 – public nudity is illegal in San Francisco. But well before the law went into effect, it generated a tremendous amount of debate.

Continue Reading

Getting Back on a Bike: Exploring San Francisco on Two Wheels

Getting Back on a Bike: Exploring San Francisco on Two Wheels

I spent a sunny Wednesday cruising through the city alongside a great San Francisco native on a bike tour facilitated by Streets of San Francisco (SoSF) – which is not anywhere near a normal activity for me.

Continue Reading

Affinity for Stone: The Public Art of Ruth Asawa

Affinity for Stone: The Public Art of Ruth Asawa

Stone is more than the plaything of geologists. Each of us sees it in special ways. Take a look at stone in two masterworks by San Francisco artist Ruth Asawa.

Continue Reading

Geological Outings Around the Bay: The Great Slickenside of Corona Heights

Geological Outings Around the Bay: The Great Slickenside of Corona Heights

Everyone loves San Francisco, but geologists love it for reasons others don't, such as its gigantic slickenside.

Continue Reading

Change.org Asks Developers to "Hack for Change"

Change.org Asks Developers to "Hack for Change"

Do you have the next big idea to transform the world? Join Hack for Change and bring your dream to reality.

Continue Reading

The Changing Bay

The Changing Bay

Peer into San Francisco Bay and you probably won't see much, thanks to the murky water the bay is known for. But over the past decade, scientists have made a surprising discovery — the bay's water is clearing. As Lauren Sommer reports, clearer water is not always good news.

Continue Reading

Combating Bay Invaders

Combating Bay Invaders

Hundreds of invasive species have been found in San Francisco Bay, one of the most invaded estuaries in the world. Hoping to restore native fish and wildlife, California has passed the strictest rules in the nation to prevent ocean freighters from introducing more foreign species to the bay. But as Lauren Sommer reports, the standards are so tough, officials may not be able to enforce them.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes: Science on the SPOT: Watching the Tides

Producer's Notes: Science on the SPOT: Watching the Tides

A little white shack with the red roof along Crissy Field holds a lot of history and houses vitally important scientific instruments.

Continue Reading

Sand Waves and the Golden Gate

Sand Waves and the Golden Gate

Mapping of the underwater topography (called bathymetry) reveals landscapes fundamental to understanding the Bay Area's unique geology. The Golden Gate strait connects the San Francisco Bay to the open Pacific Ocean and is only one mile across.

Continue Reading

Landfill and Liquefaction

Landfill and Liquefaction

Although it may not be obvious at first glance, the bay side of San Francisco is largely artificial.

Continue Reading

Going UP: Sea Level Rise in San Francisco Bay

Going UP: Sea Level Rise in San Francisco Bay

Scientists say it's no secret San Francisco Bay is rising, along with all of the earth's oceans. The reason — global warming. This rise in sea level will affect everyone who lives, works, or plays near the bay. QUEST asks how high will the Bay rise and when? And what steps can communities take to plan for it?

Continue Reading

Exploring Big Break Regional Shoreline

Exploring Big Break Regional Shoreline

Big Break Regional Shoreline is a part of the great 1,680-square-mile San Francisco/San Joaquin Delta. This "Inland Coast" is home to 70 species of birds, and provides valuable habitat for beavers, muskrats, and river otters.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes: DIY Fog at The Exploratorium

Producer's Notes: DIY Fog at The Exploratorium

Ever wonder how advection fog is produced? Learn how from The Exploratorium.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes: Science of Fog

Producer's Notes: Science of Fog

While foggy days aren't ideal for a summertime picnics, coastal fog does benefit the ecology of the Bay Area.

Continue Reading

Solar Heats Up in S.F.

Solar Heats Up in S.F.

The solar industry has descended on the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco this week. QUEST Senior Radio Editor Andrea Kissack reports from the Intersolar North America Conference and Expo.

Continue Reading

Web Extra: Exploring the Bay Lab

Web Extra: Exploring the Bay Lab

Join the Bay Lab field trip as fifth graders study the San Francisco Bay's mudflats and eelgrass beds with the help of seine nets, hip wader boots, microscopes, and mud core samplers.

Continue Reading

Exploring the Lower Russian River

Exploring the Lower Russian River

The Russian River originates in the redwood forests of Mendocino County and winds its way gently south thorough Sonoma County. One of the wildest spots on the main stem of the Russian River is towards the end, near its mouth. Here the waters widen, fresh water mixing with the tidal flows of the ocean, and the influences of two dynamic ecosystems merge.

Continue Reading

New original science video series from QUEST: Science on the SPOT

New original science video series from QUEST: Science on the SPOT

QUEST is pleased to announce a new original science video series, Science on the SPOT. Science on the SPOT goes behind the scenes at local San Francisco Bay Area labs, follows breaking discoveries, and gets you special access to obscure science locations and collections.

Continue Reading

Exploring the Pulgas Water Temple area

Exploring the Pulgas Water Temple area

The San Francisco Peninsula Watershed, managed by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, is home to trails that offer access to remote wilderness, Northern California geology, and opportunities to appreciate the complexity of providing 2.4 million people with a clean water supply.

Continue Reading