The Science of Sustainability

Tag: Physics

Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place

Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place

A record number of visitors mobbed San Francisco's Exploratorium on its last day at the Palace of Fine Arts. The mood was bittersweet–not just visitors but a good part of the staff grew up at this place. But for the Exploratorium, the magic of science is where you make it.

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Introducing the Higgs Boson

Introducing the Higgs Boson

The Bay Area has a big community of physicists involved with the Higgs boson project, and the Physics Department at UC Berkeley has scheduled a special seminar on the topic this coming Friday.

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NOVA “Fabric of the Cosmos” with Brian Green 11/2 Live Webcast

NOVA “Fabric of the Cosmos” with Brian Green 11/2 Live Webcast

Today at 6PM PST, The World Science Festival, Columbia University and NOVA are hosting a screening of 'What is Space?' to coincide with the 'NOVA: Fabric of the Cosmos' series premiere. Also included will be Saul Perlmutter, local Lawrence Berkeley Lab astrophysicist and winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics.

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Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols

Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols

Artist Kate Nichols synthesizes silver nanoparticles and incorporates them into her unique and colorful macroscale pieces.

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50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom

50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom

50 years ago, eminent physicist Richard Feynman gave a gave a prophetic speech at Caltech entitled, "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom." The speech described a rich world of possibilities that could arise if we only applied ourselves toward controlling matter on smaller and smaller scales.

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Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who use phenomena such as exploding stars and gravitational lenses to explore the dark cosmos.

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The Tantalizing Physics of Invisibility Cloaks

The Tantalizing Physics of Invisibility Cloaks

The prospect of such technology dazzles the imagination. Could we use such a cloak to hide spy planes? Ugly buildings? UFO landing sites?

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An Ode to Enrico Fermi

An Ode to Enrico Fermi

The concept of the "Fermi Problem"–a hard question made readily accessible by back-of-the-envelope calculations and familiar knowledge–is still powerful in physics and beyond. Science teachers routinely use these types of questions as brain teasers.

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Superconductivity: an Arsenic-Laced Future?

Superconductivity: an Arsenic-Laced Future?

In February of last year scientists discovered a new champion in their quest for a better superconductor, a material based on iron and, curiously enough, arsenic.

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Reporter's Notes: Goodbye to the Bevatron

Reporter's Notes: Goodbye to the Bevatron

Much as I tried to get Stewart Loken to wax poetic about the demise of the Bevatron, the truth is that he – and, I'll bet, a lot of scientists – just don't think that way.

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Inside the Stanford Linear Accelerator

Inside the Stanford Linear Accelerator

On the heels of the opening of the Large Hadron Collider last year, I was curious about these particle accelerators: how they work, what research is conducted there, and most importantly why.

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Producer's Notes: Inside an Explosion

Producer's Notes: Inside an Explosion

We see or hear about explosions practically every day on TV, the movies and in the news, most people have no idea what an explosion really is.

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Producer's Notes for Make At Home: Tabletop Linear Accelerator

Producer's Notes for Make At Home: Tabletop Linear Accelerator

My favorite Make projects all seem to have something to do with things that other people might say "Don't try this at home." In this case we went out to the Make Magazine "Test Lab" to learn how to make a small steel ball fly across the room using magnets… good clean fun in my book.

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Producer's Notes: Physics of sailing

Producer's Notes: Physics of sailing

It was another average Tuesday. I was sitting at my desk, looking at my calendar. Another day of budget meetings, returning emails, reviewing contracts, yawn. The usual buzz of production was going on around me, a crew going out to do a story about… sailing. Ah sailing, my favorite topic.

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The Large Hadron Collider: The Who, What and Where of the Why Machine

The Large Hadron Collider: The Who, What and Where of the Why Machine

Here's an overview of some good articles and web content about the Large Hadron Collider, to get you up to speed on particle physics.

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Producer's Notes: How Edison Got His Groove Back

Producer's Notes: How Edison Got His Groove Back

I love the idea that he was just listening to the radio one day and heard that the Library of Congress was failing in its struggle to preserve a significant portion of our nation's music and sound heritage. Haber basically thought, "well, as a designer of instrumentation for particle physics, I think I can help." And that's what he did.

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Nobel Winner Used Stars to Map History of the Universe

Nobel Winner Used Stars to Map History of the Universe

Sitting in a small, non-descript room in the basement of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in Berkeley, astronomy graduate student Hannah Swift and physicist Saul Perlmutter are searching for supernovae, stars destroyed in huge explosions millions or billions of years ago.

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Producer's Notes - Super Laser at the National Ignition Facility

Producer's Notes - Super Laser at the National Ignition Facility

Inside the National Ignition Facility. Lawrence Livermore National Lab is building the world's largest laser. Actually, the National Ignition Facility won't have only one laser beam. It will use 192 world-class lasers, all firing simultaneously. In a few billionths of a second about 500 trillion watts, which is nearly 1000 times the power generated in […]

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World Series, uncorked

World Series, uncorked

Dave Barker of the Exploratorium gets some batting tipsWhen I think of baseball and science, I always remember poor Sammy Sosa. In 2003, he was suspended from seven games with the Chicago Cubs for using a bat that had cork in it–an illegal move, according to Major League Baseball rules. I certainly don't feel sorry […]

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