The Science of Sustainability

Tag: Physics

Cementing a More Sustainable Future

Cementing a More Sustainable Future

A team of innovative students at UNC Charlotte develop a game-changing material poised to improve the way we build our cities and our homes.

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Attack of the Killer Electrons! New Mission Searches for Mysterious Space Particles

Attack of the Killer Electrons! New Mission Searches for Mysterious Space Particles

They're out there… lurking in Earth's magnetic fields and damaging any satellite in their path.

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Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place

Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place

A record number of visitors mobbed San Francisco's Exploratorium on its last day at the Palace of Fine Arts. The mood was bittersweet–not just visitors but a good part of the staff grew up at this place. But for the Exploratorium, the magic of science is where you make it.

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Introducing the Higgs Boson

Introducing the Higgs Boson

The Bay Area has a big community of physicists involved with the Higgs boson project, and the Physics Department at UC Berkeley has scheduled a special seminar on the topic this coming Friday.

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Space Telescope to Begin Search for Black Holes

Space Telescope to Begin Search for Black Holes

NASA's newest space telescope, NuStar, will soon begin its hunt for black holes. Scientists are hoping to learn more about how they grow and why they're such messy eaters.

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Energy-Saving Windows Get Smarter

Energy-Saving Windows Get Smarter

Buildings are responsible for 40% of the country’s energy use. So, researchers are trying improve our energy efficiency by making windows dynamic and intelligent.

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NOVA “Fabric of the Cosmos” with Brian Green 11/2 Live Webcast

NOVA “Fabric of the Cosmos” with Brian Green 11/2 Live Webcast

Today at 6PM PST, The World Science Festival, Columbia University and NOVA are hosting a screening of 'What is Space?' to coincide with the 'NOVA: Fabric of the Cosmos' series premiere. Also included will be Saul Perlmutter, local Lawrence Berkeley Lab astrophysicist and winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics.

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The Gritty Side of Major League Baseball

The Gritty Side of Major League Baseball

The science behind the decades-old MLB tradition of rubbing down baseballs with mud before they hit the field.

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Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Berkeley Lab Physicist Shares Nobel

Meet one of the three winners of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Lawrence Berkeley Lab astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter. He explains how dark energy, which makes up 70 percent of the universe, is causing our universe to expand.

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Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols

Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols

Artist Kate Nichols synthesizes silver nanoparticles and incorporates them into her unique and colorful macroscale pieces.

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Homegrown Particle Accelerators

Homegrown Particle Accelerators

QUEST journeys back to find out how physicists on the UC Berkeley campus in the 1930s, and at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in the 1970s, created "atom smashers" that led to key discoveries about the tiny constituents of the atom and paved the way for the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

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50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom

50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom

50 years ago, eminent physicist Richard Feynman gave a gave a prophetic speech at Caltech entitled, "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom." The speech described a rich world of possibilities that could arise if we only applied ourselves toward controlling matter on smaller and smaller scales.

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Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who use phenomena such as exploding stars and gravitational lenses to explore the dark cosmos.

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The Tantalizing Physics of Invisibility Cloaks

The Tantalizing Physics of Invisibility Cloaks

The prospect of such technology dazzles the imagination. Could we use such a cloak to hide spy planes? Ugly buildings? UFO landing sites?

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QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion

QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion

Paul Doherty of the Exploratorium performs a "sit-down" lecture on one of Sir Issac Newton's most famous laws.

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An Ode to Enrico Fermi

An Ode to Enrico Fermi

The concept of the "Fermi Problem"–a hard question made readily accessible by back-of-the-envelope calculations and familiar knowledge–is still powerful in physics and beyond. Science teachers routinely use these types of questions as brain teasers.

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Superconductivity: an Arsenic-Laced Future?

Superconductivity: an Arsenic-Laced Future?

In February of last year scientists discovered a new champion in their quest for a better superconductor, a material based on iron and, curiously enough, arsenic.

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Reporter's Notes: Goodbye to the Bevatron

Reporter's Notes: Goodbye to the Bevatron

Much as I tried to get Stewart Loken to wax poetic about the demise of the Bevatron, the truth is that he – and, I'll bet, a lot of scientists – just don't think that way.

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Inside the Stanford Linear Accelerator

Inside the Stanford Linear Accelerator

On the heels of the opening of the Large Hadron Collider last year, I was curious about these particle accelerators: how they work, what research is conducted there, and most importantly why.

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Producer's Notes: Inside an Explosion

Producer's Notes: Inside an Explosion

We see or hear about explosions practically every day on TV, the movies and in the news, most people have no idea what an explosion really is.

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