The Science of Sustainability

Tag: kqedquest

Earth-Sized Planets Could Be Common

Earth-Sized Planets Could Be Common

The Earth may not be as unique as we think it is. That's according to findings announced today by UC Berkeley. Astronomers there believe that Earth-sized planets may be more abundant in the universe than previously thought.

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Reporter's Notes: Personalized Medicine

Reporter's Notes: Personalized Medicine

You've probably heard about some of the breakthroughs in personal genome sequencing, where companies take a look at your DNA and send back your risk profile. But there's a flip side to all this genetic research that doesn't have to do with risk: personalized medicine.

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Reporter's Notes: The Politics of Green Wine

Reporter's Notes: The Politics of Green Wine

I often look at the chemical ingredients in what I buy. I shop at farmers markets for organic produce and use green cleaning supplies. So, it caught me off guard when a friend remarked, "you are so aware of what you eat, why aren't you just as curious about what you drink?"

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Reporter's Notes: Do We Need Nuclear?

Reporter's Notes: Do We Need Nuclear?

More people appear to be saying "yes" these days, even if grudgingly. The question is: Is it too late?

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Reporter's Notes: Journey to the Farallones

Reporter's Notes: Journey to the Farallones

Our trip to the Farallon Islands was certainly eventful: seasickness (me), bug bites (me) and immersion in one of the most unique wildlife habitats in the world (luckily). This chain of windblown rocks, about 27 miles from San Francisco, is teeming with 300,000 seabirds in the spring and summer.

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Reporter's Notes: Depression Advancements

Reporter's Notes: Depression Advancements

This radio story tries to cram a lot into five minutes, so if you don't find what you need here, put a comment on the blog, below and I'll see if I can't provide a lead to more information.

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Reporter's Notes: Museum 2.0

Reporter's Notes: Museum 2.0

Hard economic times and changing social trends have some museums undergoing a 21st century re-design. The focus is on creating more visitor-centered exhibits using new media tools and more input from the public.

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Reporter's Notes: Where's my Hydrogen Highway

Reporter's Notes: Where's my Hydrogen Highway

Hydrogen is not exactly a fuel. That is, we don't burn it to make energy. It's used more as a medium for storing and transporting energy.

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Playing the Oldest Recordings

Playing the Oldest Recordings

Last summer, QUEST told you about how scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab have developed a technology to playback old audio recordings using visual scans.

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Reporter's Notes: Cash for Clunkers

Reporter's Notes: Cash for Clunkers

As this radio story airs, Congress is debating two Cash for Clunkers proposals, one from the Senate and one from the House of Representatives. (A third proposal, also from the Senate, is almost identical to the House version.) Both would pay consumers to scrap their "clunkers" in exchange for brand-new, more fuel-efficient models.

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Reporter's Notes: Crash Landing

Reporter's Notes: Crash Landing

When the LCROSS satellite, nicknamed Centaur, smacks into the south pole of the moon in late October, it is expected to produce a plume of dust 37 miles high, which may be visible from Earth with a good backyard telescope. It will be visible in an arc from Hawaii to Texas.

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Reporter's Notes: Swine Flu and You

Reporter's Notes: Swine Flu and You

As this story is being produced, the reports on swine flu are changing hourly. Cases are popping up closer and closer to home, and the CDC is updating several times a day on the spread of the virus, and plans to fight it. The $64,000 question is how worried we should be.

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Apply now for the QUEST Science Education Institute

Apply now for the QUEST Science Education Institute

Applications are due May 15 for the 2009-2010 QUEST Science Education Institute.

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Underwater Update

Underwater Update

We heard about the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's new underwater laboratory in a radio story last fall. When that story aired, the lab (known as the Monterey Accelerated Research System, or MARS) was just getting going, with lots of neat experiments planned. Now, few of those have become a reality.

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Reporter's Notes: Sewage Spills Increasing

Reporter's Notes: Sewage Spills Increasing

The biggest problem can be the smallest thing, and that's the case in the sewer world. More than 20 million gallons of raw sewage spilled into California waterways last year, according to the state Department of Water Resources Control Board. That's not counting the partially treated sewage that makes its way into our water from overflows and sewer system malfunctions.

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Using the Online Photo Community Flickr for Science Education

Using the Online Photo Community Flickr for Science Education

With its powerful, yet easy-to-use features Flickr offers science educators a number of ways to bring abstract concepts to life and add depth and color to theoretical understanding.

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Reporter's Notes: High Tech in the Vineyards

Reporter's Notes: High Tech in the Vineyards

Wine making is indeed an art form, but it is increasingly becoming more scientific. I knew growing wine grapes requires a lot of attention to detail — there is the terroir, pests and diseases and all those microclimates. But who would have known, driving down Hwy 29, the main thoroughfare through the Napa Valley, that many of those vineyards are totally wired.

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Reporter's Notes: Medicine from the Ocean Floor

Reporter's Notes: Medicine from the Ocean Floor

Scientists gather samples on the ocean floor. Credit: Roger Linington.There's nothing new about looking to nature to cure disease – we've been doing it for thousands of years, with good results. (Two recent examples: The active ingredient in aspirin was first identified in the bark of the willow tree. And we have the Pacific yew […]

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Reporter's Notes: Changes at the Pump

Reporter's Notes: Changes at the Pump

You'd have to be a real gas pump aficionado to notice the new gear that gas stations across California are required to have installed by April 1. California's gas nozzles have been outfitted for some time with vapor-capture devices, designed to cut back on the amount of volatile organic compounds – those smelly fumes – that escape when you pump gas.

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Reporter's Notes: Tracking Carbon through Your Cell Phone

Reporter's Notes: Tracking Carbon through Your Cell Phone

"Do I get to keep the phone?"

Not exactly the environmentally-conscious line of thinking that organizers were hoping for, but understandable for those high-schoolers holding a brand new, latest version of the Nokia in their hands.

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