The Science of Sustainability

Tag: invasive species

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

In response to the major threats posed to the Great Lakes by invasive Asian carp, engineers have developed devices to keep them out, but delays in deciding how to implement them might give the fish an edge.

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Lionfish, Pythons, and Garlic Mustard — Oh My!

Lionfish, Pythons, and Garlic Mustard — Oh My!

Across America, invasive species are destroying ecosystems faster than ecologists can find solutions.

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Fending off Invasive Species with Science, Education, and a Beer Can

Fending off Invasive Species with Science, Education, and a Beer Can

How an alert Boy Scout, hard working biologists, and continued vigilance have helped one Great Plains state remain free of invasive zebra mussels — for now.

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The Ant-Driven Landscape

The Ant-Driven Landscape

Invasive ant species have powerful—and poorly known—effects on a region's soil.

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Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive species are here and more are on the way! Find out about the problems and some possible solutions.

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You Say Sweet Potato, I Say New World

You Say Sweet Potato, I Say New World

As you fill your grocery cart with food for Thanksgiving, pause for a minute and think about where that food came from. I don’t mean is it local or organic or hormone/pesticide /gluten-free—I mean is it Old World or New World? On what continent did that food evolve?

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Asian Carp, an "Alien" Threat to Lake Erie

Asian Carp, an "Alien" Threat to Lake Erie

Lake Erie is considered to be the most productive of all five of the Great Lakes.Within its waters are diverse and interdependent plants and animals that make up an intricate web of life. Mostly due to human carelessness, the lake has become home to an increasing number of non-native plants, animals, and micro-organisms which threaten […]

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Rumors and Truth in Lake Tahoe

Rumors and Truth in Lake Tahoe

A few weeks ago, scuba divers in Lake Tahoe found the body of a man who had drowned in the lake 17 years ago. Still in its wetsuit, the body was very well preserved. Because the water in this high alpine lake is so cold, decomposition is very slow. This fact has spawned rumors, the most famous of which involves Jacques Cousteau and still makes me shudder, years after I first heard it.

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Climate Change Favors Invasive Species in California Grasslands

Climate Change Favors Invasive Species in California Grasslands

California’s grasslands are some of the most heavily invaded habitats in the state. As the climate changes—temperatures increase and water becomes scarcer—the conditions will favor exotic grasses, which will become even more prevalent.

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Combating Bay Invaders

Combating Bay Invaders

California has passed the strictest rules in the country to prevent ocean freighters from introducing more foreign species to the bay. But the standards are so tough, officials may not be able to enforce them.

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Sudden Oak Death Plus Wildfire: A Natural Experiment

Sudden Oak Death Plus Wildfire: A Natural Experiment

A natural experiment created by the overlap of the Basin Complex Fire and a UC Davis study allowed scientists to test whether SOD did in fact make wildfire worse. What they found was not what the news media or the firefighters predicted.

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15 Months Later, Rediscovered San Francisco Plant Thrives

15 Months Later, Rediscovered San Francisco Plant Thrives

Fifteen months after a native plant thought to be extinct was rediscovered in San Francisco, local botanists have succeeded in growing it and are making plans to plant it out in the wild.

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Spider Invaders

Spider Invaders

Spiders seem to be everywhere this fall. There are dozens of spider webs on my deck; each morning, I destroy a new web as I leave the house. It seems like every time I go outside, I wipe spider silk from my face. And it’s not just my yard—several of my friends have noticed lots of spiders recently, too. I wondered if we’re experiencing a bumper year for spiders, so I asked a few arachnologist friends about it.

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Reporter's Notes: Coping with Ants at Home

Reporter's Notes: Coping with Ants at Home

Argentine ants have had amazing success as an invasive species in the US. Their West Coast super colony numbers in the billions and spans from Mexico to Oregon. But aside from invading homes, they've had a dramatic effect on native ants and local ecosystems.

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Producer's Notes: Hog Wild

Producer's Notes: Hog Wild

I knew going into this story that we might ruffle some feathers. But one of the things that made this story so intriguing to me is that it would bring up some questions about where people stand on what can be a pretty touchy subject.

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No Pond Turtle Left Behind

No Pond Turtle Left Behind

By creating the best possible environment for the turtles, they grow 3-4 times faster than they would in the wild.

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QUEST Season 2 Web Premiere: The Fierce Humboldt Squid

QUEST Season 2 Web Premiere: The Fierce Humboldt Squid

A mysterious sea creature up to 7 feet long, with 10 arms, a sharp beak and a ravenous appetite, has invaded ocean waters off Northern California. Packs of fierce Humboldt Squid attack nearly everything they see, from fish to scuba divers. Marine biologists are working to discover why they’ve headed north from their traditional homes […]

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Never Used a Pooter?

Never Used a Pooter?

Cal Academy scientist Kelly Herbinson collects ants with a Bay Area science teacherAs the winter drags on, I often think fondly of a chilly Saturday in December where I found myself in a small alleyway in San Francisco trying to suck elusive ants into a rubber tube called a pooter. What was the point of […]

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