The Science of Sustainability

Tag: invasive species

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

In response to the major threats posed to the Great Lakes by invasive Asian carp, engineers have developed devices to keep them out, but delays in deciding how to implement them might give the fish an edge.

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“The Vine That Ate the South” Heads North

“The Vine That Ate the South” Heads North

The invasive vine known as kudzu has twined itself into Southern culture, but it’s a big environmental headache, causing crop and property damage and loss of biodiversity. And now the vine’s coming north.

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Lionfish, Pythons, and Garlic Mustard — Oh My!

Lionfish, Pythons, and Garlic Mustard — Oh My!

Across America, invasive species are destroying ecosystems faster than ecologists can find solutions.

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Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?

Go behind the scenes with the scientists working to keep Lake Tahoe pristine and protect it for generations to come.

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Fending off Invasive Species with Science, Education, and a Beer Can

Fending off Invasive Species with Science, Education, and a Beer Can

How an alert Boy Scout, hard working biologists, and continued vigilance have helped one Great Plains state remain free of invasive zebra mussels — for now.

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The Ant-Driven Landscape

The Ant-Driven Landscape

Invasive ant species have powerful—and poorly known—effects on a region's soil.

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Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive species are here and more are on the way! Find out about the problems and some possible solutions.

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Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

UC Berkeley's University Herbarium boasts one of the largest and oldest collections of seaweed in the United States. Herbarium curator Kathy Ann Miller is leading a massive project to preserve digitally nearly 80,000 specimens of west coast seaweed.

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You Say Sweet Potato, I Say New World

You Say Sweet Potato, I Say New World

As you fill your grocery cart with food for Thanksgiving, pause for a minute and think about where that food came from. I don’t mean is it local or organic or hormone/pesticide /gluten-free—I mean is it Old World or New World? On what continent did that food evolve?

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Asian Carp, an "Alien" Threat to Lake Erie

Asian Carp, an "Alien" Threat to Lake Erie

Lake Erie is considered to be the most productive of all five of the Great Lakes.Within its waters are diverse and interdependent plants and animals that make up an intricate web of life. Mostly due to human carelessness, the lake has become home to an increasing number of non-native plants, animals, and micro-organisms which threaten […]

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Asian Carp: Threat to Great Lakes

Asian Carp: Threat to Great Lakes

The invasive Asian carp has wreaked havoc in the Mississippi River system. The voracious plankton eaters have out-competed native fish and have become the dominant species in many locations. If the carp reach the Great Lakes, they pose a threat to its $7 billion fishery, so a battle against them is taking place on many fronts.

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Cool Critters: Lake Erie Water Snake

Cool Critters: Lake Erie Water Snake

Within and along the waters of Lake Erie (one of the five Great Lakes), there is a daily struggle for survival between natives and unwelcomed invasive species.

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Climate Change Could Mean Cloudy Future for Lake Tahoe

Climate Change Could Mean Cloudy Future for Lake Tahoe

Over the last 15 years, more than a billion dollars has been spent to protect Lake Tahoe's clear waters from runoff and erosion. Now, new threats to lake's clarity are emerging, just as restoration funding is drying up.

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Rumors and Truth in Lake Tahoe

Rumors and Truth in Lake Tahoe

A few weeks ago, scuba divers in Lake Tahoe found the body of a man who had drowned in the lake 17 years ago. Still in its wetsuit, the body was very well preserved. Because the water in this high alpine lake is so cold, decomposition is very slow. This fact has spawned rumors, the most famous of which involves Jacques Cousteau and still makes me shudder, years after I first heard it.

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Climate Change Favors Invasive Species in California Grasslands

Climate Change Favors Invasive Species in California Grasslands

California’s grasslands are some of the most heavily invaded habitats in the state. As the climate changes—temperatures increase and water becomes scarcer—the conditions will favor exotic grasses, which will become even more prevalent.

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Combating Bay Invaders

Combating Bay Invaders

Hundreds of invasive species have been found in San Francisco Bay, one of the most invaded estuaries in the world. Hoping to restore native fish and wildlife, California has passed the strictest rules in the nation to prevent ocean freighters from introducing more foreign species to the bay. But as Lauren Sommer reports, the standards are so tough, officials may not be able to enforce them.

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Combating Bay Invaders

Combating Bay Invaders

California has passed the strictest rules in the country to prevent ocean freighters from introducing more foreign species to the bay. But the standards are so tough, officials may not be able to enforce them.

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Sudden Oak Death Plus Wildfire: A Natural Experiment

Sudden Oak Death Plus Wildfire: A Natural Experiment

A natural experiment created by the overlap of the Basin Complex Fire and a UC Davis study allowed scientists to test whether SOD did in fact make wildfire worse. What they found was not what the news media or the firefighters predicted.

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15 Months Later, Rediscovered San Francisco Plant Thrives

15 Months Later, Rediscovered San Francisco Plant Thrives

Fifteen months after a native plant thought to be extinct was rediscovered in San Francisco, local botanists have succeeded in growing it and are making plans to plant it out in the wild.

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Spider Invaders

Spider Invaders

Spiders seem to be everywhere this fall. There are dozens of spider webs on my deck; each morning, I destroy a new web as I leave the house. It seems like every time I go outside, I wipe spider silk from my face. And it’s not just my yard—several of my friends have noticed lots of spiders recently, too. I wondered if we’re experiencing a bumper year for spiders, so I asked a few arachnologist friends about it.

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