The Science of Sustainability

Tag: fungus

Seeing the Farm Through the Trees

Seeing the Farm Through the Trees

Growing high-value crops like edible mushrooms may help forests, and forest owners, thrive.

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Conquering Fungophobia

Conquering Fungophobia

Late fall rains signal the start of mushroom season, which can last until spring in the Bay Area. Though only experts should forage and eat wild mushrooms (following park rules about harvesting), anyone can appreciate the rich diversity of these ephemeral fruits of the forest.

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Rainy Hike at Redwood Regional Park

Rainy Hike at Redwood Regional Park

One of the joys of being a naturalist is venturing out with intrepid hikers — rain or shine — to catch the action in nature.

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Life-Threatening Mushroom Poisoning

Life-Threatening Mushroom Poisoning

Since Northern California's mushroom season began last September, four people have suffered life-threatening injuries after eating poisonous wild mushrooms.

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Fungi Underfoot

Fungi Underfoot

No, this blog post is not about athlete’s foot or toenail fungus or any other infection you might inadvertently catch from the floor of a locker room or the seat of a BART train. It’s about giant underground fungi and their reproductive parts– a.k.a. mushrooms.

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Newt Migration

Newt Migration

The newts are on the move again. Each fall, after the rains start, the newts of Berkeley’s Tilden Park start migrating from the woods to waters of Wildcat Creek, where they mate and lay their eggs. South Park Drive, popular with cyclists and Sunday drivers, crosses their migratory path. Each year from November 1 to April 1 the road is closed to cars, to prevent the newts from getting squished. (How did the newt cross the road? Not by being run over, that’s for sure.)

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Tiny Lichen Point to Bigger Pollution Problems in Yosemite

Tiny Lichen Point to Bigger Pollution Problems in Yosemite

Air pollution may seem like an urban problem, but it’s becoming an increasing concern in California’s national parks.

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