The Science of Sustainability

Tag: full-image

Do Water Pollution Tests Lead to "Dead Zones"?

Do Water Pollution Tests Lead to "Dead Zones"?

The problem with pee: a scientist blows the whistle on sewage-treatment plants, claiming they harm water quality even when meeting official pollution-control limits.

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Picturing the Invisible: A Conversation with Artist Chris Jordan

Picturing the Invisible: A Conversation with Artist Chris Jordan

In this video, photographic artist Chris Jordan talks with QUEST television host Simran Sethi about the passion, purpose, and creative process behind his eye-opening works of art that depict the collective impacts of human activities on our society and environment.

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A Hidden World Thrives Below the Snow

A Hidden World Thrives Below the Snow

Although the layer of snow that blankets much of the Northern Hemisphere every winter looks inhospitable, it’s actually a cozy refuge for many plants and animals. But as the world warms up, this safe haven is disappearing.

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Cats, Chemicals, and Consumer Power

Cats, Chemicals, and Consumer Power

How daily exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals affects people and pets.

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Dog Detectives: A Nose for Conservation

Dog Detectives: A Nose for Conservation

Not just sniffing around, wonder dogs guide scientists to treasure troves of information and play leading roles in efforts to protect wildlife and wilderness.

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Out of Sight, Out of Mine

Out of Sight, Out of Mine

Many Midwestern mines ceased operation long ago, but surrounding land and streams still feel their toxic effects.

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The Ski-cast: Is There Hope for the Slopes?

The Ski-cast: Is There Hope for the Slopes?

Despite predictions that many ski resorts in New England and around the nation may no longer be economically viable in just 15 years, researchers point to adaptation as the key to staying the course.

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Bison and Cranes Reunited to Support Habitat Restoration

Bison and Cranes Reunited to Support Habitat Restoration

Find out how the reintroduction of bison to a central Nebraska island can help restore habitat for flocks of sandhill cranes during their annual visit on the Platte River.

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Landowners Make Way for More Shoreline

Landowners Make Way for More Shoreline

How one family’s decision to remove their waterfront wall has sparked the recovery of coastal ecosystems on a popular Washington island.

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Lessons from a Global Garden: Growing More Food with Less

Lessons from a Global Garden: Growing More Food with Less

Farmers and community gardeners from around the world gather in Mendocino, California to explore a method for growing more food on less land — that reduces the need for precious resources.

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The Key to Sustainable Fish Farming? Vegetarian Fish

The Key to Sustainable Fish Farming? Vegetarian Fish

World demand for seafood is rising, but many of the world’s oceans are already overfished. Now scientists are creating vegetarian diets for species like trout, which may lessen the strain on over-fished oceans.

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From the Top of the Space Needle: A New View on Carbon Emissions

From the Top of the Space Needle: A New View on Carbon Emissions

A CO2 monitor atop Seattle’s Space Needle supplies empirical data on the city's carbon emissions

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Searching for Memories on an Altered Landscape

Searching for Memories on an Altered Landscape

While prairie is converted to cropland at a breakneck pace, one conservation biologist in Nebraska is finding an alternative way to jog the collective memory of the Great Plains landscape.

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From Screenwriter to Soil-Saver: The Double Legacy of Louis Bromfield

From Screenwriter to Soil-Saver: The Double Legacy of Louis Bromfield

Best known as a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, and Hollywood hobnobber, Louis Bromfield was also celebrated as a pioneer of sustainable agriculture — a lesser-known part of his legacy that lives on today at his Ohio farm.

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“Elephants and Tigers” Beneath Our Feet: Q&A with Soil Scientist Diana Wall

“Elephants and Tigers” Beneath Our Feet: Q&A with Soil Scientist Diana Wall

Find out how biodiversity below ground influences life above ground.

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Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

In response to the major threats posed to the Great Lakes by invasive Asian carp, engineers have developed devices to keep them out, but delays in deciding how to implement them might give the fish an edge.

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Could your driveway be poisoning your kids?

Could your driveway be poisoning your kids?

Parking lots coated with coal tar, a gooey black waste product of steel manufacturing, shed the coatings at a high rate. This toxic residue is showing up in dust on nearby apartment surfaces.

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Denimite: Discovering New Frontiers for Old Jeans

Denimite: Discovering New Frontiers for Old Jeans

A husband and wife team explore the potential for using recycled denim to create solid composite countertops, dashboards and other unexpected items.

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Canola, Flax, and Sunflower: The Hidden Power of Oilseeds

Canola, Flax, and Sunflower: The Hidden Power of Oilseeds

Much more than just an alternative to cooking with butter and animal fats, oilseeds hold the promise of additional benefits to our health, economy, and environment.

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Birds, Blades, and the Brutal Business of Clean Energy

Birds, Blades, and the Brutal Business of Clean Energy

Does a shift toward renewable energy sources mean choosing between wind turbines and wildlife? Author William H. Funk weighs in.

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