The Science of Sustainability

Tag: Environment

Reporter's Notes: The Politics of Green Wine

Reporter's Notes: The Politics of Green Wine

I often look at the chemical ingredients in what I buy. I shop at farmers markets for organic produce and use green cleaning supplies. So, it caught me off guard when a friend remarked, "you are so aware of what you eat, why aren't you just as curious about what you drink?"

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Producer's Notes – Climate Watch: Unlocking the Grid

Producer's Notes – Climate Watch: Unlocking the Grid

Last summer I visited the Netherlands, the original home of the windmill. Surprisingly, I saw hardly any of the quaint structures we associate with Dutch wind power. One hundred years ago Holland had about 10,000 wooden windmills dotting its landscape. Today, barely 10% remain.

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Reporter's Notes: Where's my Hydrogen Highway

Reporter's Notes: Where's my Hydrogen Highway

Hydrogen is not exactly a fuel. That is, we don't burn it to make energy. It's used more as a medium for storing and transporting energy.

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Reporter's Notes: Cash for Clunkers

Reporter's Notes: Cash for Clunkers

As this radio story airs, Congress is debating two Cash for Clunkers proposals, one from the Senate and one from the House of Representatives. (A third proposal, also from the Senate, is almost identical to the House version.) Both would pay consumers to scrap their "clunkers" in exchange for brand-new, more fuel-efficient models.

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Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

For these notes, I thought I'd focus on something that didn’t make it into the sea lions radio broadcast: the necropsy. Each year the Marine Mammal Center treats somewhere between 600-1000 animals, including California sea lions, Pacific harbor seals, Northern elephant seals, and steller sea lions. About half of them are treated successfully at the […]

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Reporter's Notes: Sudden Oak Death

Reporter's Notes: Sudden Oak Death

There is no proven cure for Sudden Oak Death. But that doesn't mean you can't find people selling cures. In fact, the Internet is full of theories – and their related products – that explain how to treat Sudden Oak Death. The problem with them, says UC Berkeley researcher Matteo Garbelotto, is that they don't work. And in fact, he adds, they could actually harm people's backyard oak trees.

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Reporter's Notes: Sewage Spills Increasing

Reporter's Notes: Sewage Spills Increasing

The biggest problem can be the smallest thing, and that's the case in the sewer world. More than 20 million gallons of raw sewage spilled into California waterways last year, according to the state Department of Water Resources Control Board. That's not counting the partially treated sewage that makes its way into our water from overflows and sewer system malfunctions.

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Don't be a "Wasteful Wendy"

Don't be a "Wasteful Wendy"

Cool the Earth is an organization that reaches into elementary school classrooms and Girl Scout troops all over the country, and they're working to make saving energy and being good stewards of our natural resources fun.

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What Makes Us Care About Nature?

What Makes Us Care About Nature?

This question comes up endlessly in the world of environmental education. How do you inspire a person to learn, care and then take action for the environment? As someone whose professional goal is to inspire earth stewardship, I often ask anyone who will answer this big question.

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Reporter's Notes: Mass Transit Housing Plan

Reporter's Notes: Mass Transit Housing Plan

Even in these difficult economic times, California's population continues to grow, and those additional people are going to need a place to live. Recent legislation in California directs city planners to make environmentally responsible choices for new housing. One way to do that is to create transit villages.

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Gorilla Cough

Gorilla Cough

Forgive me for being Gorilla-Crazy and writing yet another blog about these creatures, but anyone who has completed a gorilla trek understands the obsession and concern. One issue: We make them sick.

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Reporter's Notes: Putting a Price on Nature

Reporter's Notes: Putting a Price on Nature

Natural capital isn't something we hear about very often, and it certainly isn't a new idea. Aldo Leopold and other conservationists recognized the role that natural ecosystems play in our lives as early as the 1940's. But understanding and measuring that role hasn't been easy.

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Reporter's Notes: Birds vs. Planes

Reporter's Notes: Birds vs. Planes

Dave Feliz calls it "the bird highway in the sky." Feliz works for California Department of Fish and Game, as area manager for the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, and he's talking about the Pacific Flyway. Millions of migratory birds travel the same route every year, called the Pacific Flyway, stretching from the north slope of […]

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Reporter's Notes: Tracking Urban Lions

Reporter's Notes: Tracking Urban Lions

It's amazing that such large animals can live so near to urban areas and remain unseen – particularly since these animals inspire such fear and alarm whenever there is a reported sighting.

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Reporter's Notes: Last Minute Rules

Reporter's Notes: Last Minute Rules

The Bush Administration has recently passed dozens of so-called "midnight regulations" – last-minute rules and amendments. Many of those new laws affect the environment, including a change to the Endangered Species Act that has California environmentalists deeply worried.

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Reporter's Notes: Building Blocks Go Green

Reporter's Notes: Building Blocks Go Green

I got interested in this story after hearing Silicon Valley venture capitalist Vinod Khosla speak at a conference this fall in Sausalito. He explained how he decides where to invest in green tech and it was fascinating. He and other top venture capitalists think they can help stop global warming and make a ton of money at the same time.

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Reporter's Notes: Dialing in on Traffic

Reporter's Notes: Dialing in on Traffic

The pilot project at UC Berkeley called Mobile Millennium uses cell phones as data points to show traffic patterns in real time. To become an early adopter of the technology, you must have an unlimited data plan on a mobile phone with a GPS system.

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Reporter's Notes: Get the Soot Out

Reporter's Notes: Get the Soot Out

It's not just truckers that will have to spend a lot of money to retrofit their diesel engines. And quite a few trucks on California roads will actually be unaffected by a new California diesel regulation. The California Air Resources Board is expected to vote on a new diesel-emissions regulation when the board meets on December 11 and 12 in Sacramento.

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Reporter's Notes: Underwater Laboratory

Reporter's Notes: Underwater Laboratory

The Eye in the Sea is one of the coolest, gee-whiz scientific projects you'll see. It's part of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's so-called MARS project (that stands for Monterey Accelerated Research System). MARS is an undersea laboratory, set up deep on the sea floor about 30 miles offshore from Monterey.

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Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

Reporter's Notes: Sea Lion Rescue

For these notes, I thought I'd focus on something that didn't make it into the sea lions radio broadcast: the necropsy.

Each year the Marine Mammal Center treats somewhere between 600-1000 animals, including California sea lions, Pacific harbor seals, Northern elephant seals, and steller sea lions. About half of them are treated successfully at the center and released into the Pacific. The other half either die naturally or have to be euthanized.

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