The Science of Sustainability

Tag: Engineering

From the Top of the Space Needle: A New View on Carbon Emissions

From the Top of the Space Needle: A New View on Carbon Emissions

A CO2 monitor atop Seattle’s Space Needle supplies empirical data on the city's carbon emissions

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Putting Nuisance Beavers to Work

Putting Nuisance Beavers to Work

Scientists in central Washington State relocate beavers in an effort to restore watersheds and reduce clashes between the animals and humans.

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Stanford Solar Car Races Across Australian Desert

Stanford Solar Car Races Across Australian Desert

Stanford University students design and race a single passenger solar car 1,800 miles across the Australian continent in an international competition that pushes the boundaries of solar-powered technology.

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The Seattle Seawall Project: Transforming Salmon Habitat

The Seattle Seawall Project: Transforming Salmon Habitat

Seattle’s urban waterfront — a noisy highway viaduct and failing seawall — is being transformed to create a welcoming environment for salmon and people.

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From High-Rise to Low Impact: A Building That Mimics a Forest

From High-Rise to Low Impact: A Building That Mimics a Forest

In the search for greater efficiency, green builders are looking to nature for answers.

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Solar plane takes off on historic cross-country trip

Solar plane takes off on historic cross-country trip

Lighter than an SUV and covered with more than 12,000 solar cells, Solar Impulse, the world's first solar plane that can fly day and night without recharging, launched from Moffet Field this morning in a cross country voyage.

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At Last:  Devil's Slide Tunnels Open

At Last: Devil's Slide Tunnels Open

Two new tunnels that will replace a cliffhanger drive, known as "Devil's Slide," finally open.

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Historic Devil's Slide Tunnels Finally About To Open

Historic Devil's Slide Tunnels Finally About To Open

It's been a long time coming. The first highway tunnels to open in California in nearly fifty years are about ready for motorists.

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Controversial California Water Plan Takes Shape

Controversial California Water Plan Takes Shape

The latest draft fails to mollify opponents to a $23 billion-dollar plan for California’s trickiest water problem: the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

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Energy Geeks Converge at ACEEE's Boot Camp

Energy Geeks Converge at ACEEE's Boot Camp

Every two years the staff of the magazine I edit, Home Energy, is invited down to the Asilomar Conference Grounds in Pacific Grove, California, to publish a daily newsletter for the biennial ACEEE Summer Study of Energy Efficiency in Buildings.

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Collaborative Creativity in the Digital World

Collaborative Creativity in the Digital World

When you think of digital art, Photoshop or a Wacom tablet may come to mind. And yes, drawing on a screen instead of a pad of paper is certainly one kind of digital art. But digital art can also happen on an entirely different level: art can be made with lines of code.

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Building a Better Hose

Building a Better Hose

Depending on the atoms used and their arrangement, engineers and chemists use polymers to create almost anything from a soft toothbrush bristle to a tough bullet-proof vest.

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Stanford Engineering Offers Free Online Classes

Stanford Engineering Offers Free Online Classes

Stanford is offering anyone with a computer and an internet connection an unprecedented opportunity to take free online courses with its engineering department.

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Life-Size Mouse Trap Needs Your Help!

Life-Size Mouse Trap Needs Your Help!

This giant kinetic sculpture is a delight to audiences both young and old and needs your help funding its tour across the US.

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Biomimicry Abounds in the Bay Area

Biomimicry Abounds in the Bay Area

By bringing biologists to the design table, biomimicry offers solutions for increasing sustainability of products, processes, and systems. A new UC Berkeley course, "How Would Nature Do That?" brings together students from architecture, engineering, business, science, and design disciplines to find solutions to sustainable design challenges.

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Robotics Enthusiasts Converge at RoboGames

Robotics Enthusiasts Converge at RoboGames

Robotics takes center stage this weekend, with robots competing against one another at the 8th annual RoboGames.

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Famous African-American Astronauts

Famous African-American Astronauts

This April is the 50th Anniversary of Yuri Gagiran going into space, the 30th Anniversary of the first US Space Shuttle Columbia launching into space and the 10th Anniversary of Yuri’s Night.

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How it Works at the Crucible

How it Works at the Crucible

I grew up wih the mantra, "If something works, take it apart and find out why”. The Crucible takes that one step further in adding artistic and community-oriented components.

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Visiting the Dentist Chair of the Future

Visiting the Dentist Chair of the Future

It probably goes without saying — the dentist’s chair isn’t the most popular place to visit. But going to the dentist may one day be a very different experience.

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5 Great Gifts for the DIY Gadget Enthusiast

5 Great Gifts for the DIY Gadget Enthusiast

The perfect gift for the DIY enthusiast in your life is just around the corner. Check out these kits which are sure to please!

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