The Science of Sustainability

Tag: conservation

Letting Bears Roam: Q&A with Ecologist Chris Morgan

Letting Bears Roam: Q&A with Ecologist Chris Morgan

According to ecologist Chris Morgan, “What’s good for bears is good for people.” Learn what this fearless expert wants us to know about bears.

Continue Reading

During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

As California's drought gets worse, farmers and conservationists are teaming up to create temporary wetlands for birds migrating on the Pacific Flyway.

Continue Reading

Reconstructing a River for Wildlife

Reconstructing a River for Wildlife

Pulling up vegetation, starting fires, and letting animals graze on riverbanks are just some of the steps being taken to improve habitat for migrating birds, including endangered species.

Continue Reading

Building Better Homes for Bumblebee Queens

Building Better Homes for Bumblebee Queens

A Nebraska scientist is building bumblebee boxes in an effort to learn more about these mysterious pollinators and get the public engaged in the scientific process.

Continue Reading

Saving the Swift Fox with Snapshots, Students and Science

Saving the Swift Fox with Snapshots, Students and Science

An endangered fox species is fighting for its existence in western Nebraska, but it’s not alone. Students from across the state are helping conduct a new study to aid in the animal's recovery.

Continue Reading

Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife

Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife

Drivers hit thousands of animals every year on California freeways, often killing the wildlife, and sometimes killing or injuring the human, too. Several western states have built fencing and other infrastructure to help wildlife cross freeways safely, and critics say California could be doing a lot more of the same.

Continue Reading

Fending off Invasive Species with Science, Education, and a Beer Can

Fending off Invasive Species with Science, Education, and a Beer Can

How an alert Boy Scout, hard working biologists, and continued vigilance have helped one Great Plains state remain free of invasive zebra mussels — for now.

Continue Reading

Ohio’s Bald Eagle Comeback

Ohio’s Bald Eagle Comeback

Our national symbol spreads its wings — and its reach – as it builds new nests in the heartland.

Continue Reading

The Future of Water

The Future of Water

Freshwater expert Sandra Postel reveals how water is destined to become our most precious resource— and the impact of your personal water footprint.

Continue Reading

Are Doughnuts Destroying Forests?

Are Doughnuts Destroying Forests?

A conversation with a forestry expert reveals doughnuts as unlikely contributors to global deforestation.

Continue Reading

Dabbling and Diving Ducks: Catch the Spring Show

Dabbling and Diving Ducks: Catch the Spring Show

Ducks are getting ready to make their seasonal migration away from San Francisco Bay. Come see them in their breeding finery before they're gone for the summer.

Continue Reading

Coyote Killings: A Complex Debate of Conservation and Cruelty

Coyote Killings: A Complex Debate of Conservation and Cruelty

Coyotes, reviled for preying on sheep and goats, are the most targeted predator in the U.S. This week, hunters in the tiny Modoc County town of Adin will compete in a contest to kill the most coyotes to protect their livestock–even though research shows that killing coyotes results in higher reproductive rates.

Continue Reading

Fear and Loathing in Wolf Country

Fear and Loathing in Wolf Country

After federal wildlife officials removed endangered species protections on wolves in the Rocky Mountains, hunters quickly killed them by the hundreds. If California's lone wolf leaves the state, he could meet a similar fate.

Continue Reading

Trophy Hunting: For the Love of Blood and Money

Trophy Hunting: For the Love of Blood and Money

Trophy hunters routinely pay thousands of dollars for the chance to kill big game like caribou, moose, black bear and especially grizzly bear. Trophy hunting narratives boast a love of nature. But some sociologists find a different story.

Continue Reading

Saving Bighorn Sheep, One Mural At a Time

Saving Bighorn Sheep, One Mural At a Time

Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep are animals worth seeing. With their bright white rumps and the rams' remarkable headgear, they bound and leap over seemingly impassable alpine terrain. But you may have a tricky time spotting one–there are only about four hundred in existence.

Continue Reading

The Man Who Made California Safe for Mountain Lions

The Man Who Made California Safe for Mountain Lions

More than 40 years ago, Sen. John Dunlap (D-Napa) made conservation history when his mountain lion hunting moratorium passed the California Legislature and became law in 1971. He recalls the fight to pass the bill and his guiding principle, "when in doubt, preserve."

Continue Reading

California's Deadlocked Delta: Is Carbon Farming the Future?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Is Carbon Farming the Future?

California’s Delta has a rich agricultural legacy, but farming there can be a risky business. Dozens of farms have been flooded over the past half century as aging levees have collapsed. Now, scientists are encouraging farmers to switch to a new crop. Instead of growing vegetables, they’d grow something that has all but disappeared in the Delta: wetlands.

Continue Reading

Your Videos on QUEST: Kip Evans

Your Videos on QUEST: Kip Evans

Kip Evans is a natural history documentary filmmaker and photographer from Pacific Grove, California. This is an excerpt of his short film, “Isla Holbox: Whale Shark Island."

Continue Reading

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Delta is a far cry from what it once was. About 97% of its historic marshes have been lost and scientists aren’t quite sure what the Delta once looked like. Now, a Bay Area group is working to reconstruct it through ecological detective work.

Continue Reading

Field Notes:  Oakland Zoo in Uganda

Field Notes: Oakland Zoo in Uganda

In this "Field Notes" segment, Amy Gotliffe, director of conservation at the Oakland Zoo, shares her photographs and stories from Uganda, where the zoo's Bodongo Snare Removal Project works to protect endangered chimpanzees from illegal poaching.

Continue Reading