The Science of Sustainability

Tag: climate change

Thousands March To Curb Climate Change

Thousands March To Curb Climate Change

Tens of thousands of people join rallies in Washington DC and San Francisco to urge action on climate change.

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Can Earth Survive Without Scientist-Citizens?

Can Earth Survive Without Scientist-Citizens?

Last summer, a group of top scientists warned that our penchant for growth and consumption may be pushing earth toward an irreversible tipping point. The days when scientists could share their results with just their colleagues are over, says NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco. It's time for scientists to help solve our "wicked problems."

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So How Much Does Carbon Cost?

So How Much Does Carbon Cost?

Now we have a first glimpse of how California's experiment in carbon trading is working out. The state's first auction of industrial permits for greenhouse gases actually happened last week–but results were released on Monday.

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Where Do California's Carbon Emissions Come From?

Where Do California's Carbon Emissions Come From?

Cap-and-trade will initially regulate the industrial sector and utilities. Eventually, fuels will be phased into the program, too. It's all part of AB 32, the law that requires California to bring greenhouse gas emissions back to 1990 levels by 2020. Here's a breakdown of where the emissions come from.

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Cap-and-Trade: The Glossary

Cap-and-Trade: The Glossary

You can’t navigate the new world of carbon trading unless you know the lingo. Here are some key terms.

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Watching the Atmospheric Rivers Flow

Watching the Atmospheric Rivers Flow

Researchers are gearing up to monitor the flood-causing weather monsters known as atmospheric rivers.

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In Defense of Science: An Interview with NCSE’s Eugenie Scott

In Defense of Science: An Interview with NCSE’s Eugenie Scott

Eugenie Scott, longtime director of Oakland's National Center for Science Education, has won numerous awards for helping the public understand science and defending evolution, especially against threats to replace it with “creation science” in public schools. She shares her thoughts on the challenges of communicating science in a climate of denial.

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Arrow Gobies, Ghost Shrimp and Bubble Snails: Teachers Explore the Unique Biodiversity of San Francisco Bay

Arrow Gobies, Ghost Shrimp and Bubble Snails: Teachers Explore the Unique Biodiversity of San Francisco Bay

Dedicated teachers spend a week of their summer vacation delving into science, climate change, and San Francisco Bay ecology.

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Toast To The Dry Days At Cal Academy's Prohibition NightLife

Toast To The Dry Days At Cal Academy's Prohibition NightLife

Celebrate the prohibition era with a sneak preview of Ken Burns new documentary and wine tasting at Cal Academy's NightLife.

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Cattle Ranches and Carbon

Cattle Ranches and Carbon

Researchers from UC Berkeley are working with cattle ranchers in Marin County to figure out how to increase the amount of carbon stored in the soil.

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Rumors and Truth in Lake Tahoe

Rumors and Truth in Lake Tahoe

A few weeks ago, scuba divers in Lake Tahoe found the body of a man who had drowned in the lake 17 years ago. Still in its wetsuit, the body was very well preserved. Because the water in this high alpine lake is so cold, decomposition is very slow. This fact has spawned rumors, the most famous of which involves Jacques Cousteau and still makes me shudder, years after I first heard it.

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The Deep, Cold Secret Behind Summer Fog

The Deep, Cold Secret Behind Summer Fog

Another foggy morning. Why is the Bay Area so foggy in summer? To answer that question, look west—at the Pacific Ocean.

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Climate Change Favors Invasive Species in California Grasslands

Climate Change Favors Invasive Species in California Grasslands

California’s grasslands are some of the most heavily invaded habitats in the state. As the climate changes—temperatures increase and water becomes scarcer—the conditions will favor exotic grasses, which will become even more prevalent.

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The State of the Ocean

The State of the Ocean

The ocean is our planet’s heartbeat, and the future heartbeat for billions of humans.

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Sea Lions, Herring, and Climate Change

Sea Lions, Herring, and Climate Change

I thought I’d check in on the sea lions at Pier 39. Just a few years ago, there were about 1600 of them. Then in 2009, most of them swam away.

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Resolving Clouds in Climate Change Models

Resolving Clouds in Climate Change Models

As supercomputers grow, so does their energy appetite. Researchers are trying to solve that problem by using a smaller, more pervasive technology.

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Summer Solstice, Shifting Spring

Summer Solstice, Shifting Spring

Tomorrow is our summer solstice—the longest day of the year here in the Northern Hemisphere.

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Producer's Notes: Angst in the Redwoods

Producer's Notes: Angst in the Redwoods

Even circus workers have safety nets. The folks who climb giant redwoods don’t.

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Insuring for Extreme Weather

Insuring for Extreme Weather

Climate change is throwing a wrench into the calculations of insurance companies trying to assess the risks of floods and other natural disaster events.

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Should Animals Adapt, or Should We Change Our Behavior?

Should Animals Adapt, or Should We Change Our Behavior?

The Monterey Bay Aquarium has a fun new video about climate change, called Change for the Ocean, to go with their exhibit Hot Pink Flamingos. Narrated by John Cleese and produced by Free Range Studios, the animated video is cute, funny, and pretty effective at conveying the fact that people can change their ways much faster than sea life can adapt to climate change.

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