The Science of Sustainability

Tag: birds

Getting Up Close with Cranes

Getting Up Close with Cranes

For decades, scientists have studied the annual migration of sandhill cranes through central Nebraska. A new project is using time-lapse cameras to capture and study crane behavior.

Continue Reading

During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

During Drought, Pop-Up Wetlands Give Birds a Break

As California's drought gets worse, farmers and conservationists are teaming up to create temporary wetlands for birds migrating on the Pacific Flyway.

Continue Reading

How People Drove an Evolution in Cliff Swallows

How People Drove an Evolution in Cliff Swallows

Find out how people and roadway designs have favored the survival and evolution of cliff swallows across America.

Continue Reading

Culture Clash: Of Cats, Birds and Conservation

Culture Clash: Of Cats, Birds and Conservation

Feral cats threaten native wildlife, from reptiles to birds, and often lead a miserable life. By better understanding the concerns of cat colony caretakers, wildlife biologists hope to find enough common ground to benefit both cats and wildlife.

Continue Reading

The Pleasures of Backyard Bird-Watching

The Pleasures of Backyard Bird-Watching

Get to know your feathered neighbors and find out how you can contribute to avian science and research.

Continue Reading

A Birder’s-Eye View of Conservation

A Birder’s-Eye View of Conservation

The Great Backyard Bird Count gives novice Bay Area wildlife watchers the chance to play field biologist in their own backyards and help scientists gather data on the incidence, abundance, and distribution of birds. Researchers will use sightings to identify trends that will help conserve these valuable indicators of biodiversity.

Continue Reading

Rough Waters for Sea Level Rise Planning

Rough Waters for Sea Level Rise Planning

What do Bay Area airports and some big Silicon Valley companies have in common? They sit right on the edge of San Francisco Bay, where sea level rise is expected to have a big impact by the end of the century.

Continue Reading

How Do Gulls Know When Giants Games are Ending?

How Do Gulls Know When Giants Games are Ending?

Gulls mysteriously show up at AT&T Park during the ninth inning of every San Francisco Giants game. How do they time their arrival so well? Local experts weigh in.

Continue Reading

Gulls Threaten South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Work

Gulls Threaten South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Work

One of the most ambitious wetland restoration projects in the country is underway in San Francisco Bay. Thousands of acres of those ponds are being restored for shorebirds and wildlife.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes: Science on the SPOT – Falcons Up Close

Producer's Notes: Science on the SPOT – Falcons Up Close

QUEST's web-only video series, Science on the SPOT, takes a close-up look at the Peregrine Falcon.

Continue Reading

Falconry Ruffles Feathers and Saves a Species

Falconry Ruffles Feathers and Saves a Species

This time of year, you may see birds of prey, with their wings outstretched, circling overhead – it is nesting season.

Continue Reading

Oil Spills and the Environment

Oil Spills and the Environment

The volume of oil recently spilled in the Gulf of Mexico is several thousand times what was spilled in San Francisco Bay in 2007, but the ecological studies conducted in the wake of the SF spill give us an idea of what we can expect in the Gulf.

Continue Reading

An Urban Layover for Birds: MLK Jr. Regional Shoreline

An Urban Layover for Birds: MLK Jr. Regional Shoreline

Squeezed between the Oakland International Airport and the Coliseum lies one of the best kept secrets of the bay: Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline Park, a birding hot spot. I had no idea.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes: The Farallon Islands—"California's Galapagos"

Producer's Notes: The Farallon Islands—"California's Galapagos"

Lying 28 miles off the coast of San Francisco, the jagged silhouette of the Farallon Islands disrupts the clean line of the horizon. This foreboding knot of rocks sits amid one of the most
productive marine food webs on the planet and hosts the largest seabird breeding colony in the continental United States. QUEST ventures out for a rare visit to learn what life is like on the islands and meet the scientists who call this incredibly wild place home.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes: Your Photos on QUEST—Doug Nomura

Producer's Notes: Your Photos on QUEST—Doug Nomura

San José photographer Doug Nomura has learned just how to track his subjects to create arresting photos of birds in flight. He focuses his work on the Bay Trail, a 300-mile trail around the Bay. QUEST joins Nomura on the bayfront in Sunnyvale as he works to photograph the many bird species that call the South Bay’s mudflats home, or stop here as part of their migration.

Continue Reading

Science Event Pick: Golden Gate Raptor Observatory’s 25th Anniversary

Science Event Pick: Golden Gate Raptor Observatory’s 25th Anniversary

In celebration of the 25th anniversary, there are a veritable flock of interactive events and talks scheduled over the next month.

Continue Reading

Reporter's Notes: Journey to the Farallones

Reporter's Notes: Journey to the Farallones

Our trip to the Farallon Islands was certainly eventful: seasickness (me), bug bites (me) and immersion in one of the most unique wildlife habitats in the world (luckily). This chain of windblown rocks, about 27 miles from San Francisco, is teeming with 300,000 seabirds in the spring and summer.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes for Cool Critters: Turkey Vultures

Producer's Notes for Cool Critters: Turkey Vultures

Now, a vulture isn't what typically comes to mind for making a good first impression. But this bird is absolutely gorgeous, and unbelievably interesting; we instantly fell in love.

Continue Reading

Holistic Help for Hornbills

Holistic Help for Hornbills

They're handsome, they're huge, they mate for life and they are endangered.

Continue Reading

The Joys of Citizen Science

The Joys of Citizen Science

Though it's easy to forget, any kid with a magnifying glass can tell you that you don't need a fancy degree to be a scientist. All it takes is a curious mind and a keen eye for observation. And in case the mere thought of a world full of wonders isn't enough to get you motivated, there are dozens of ways your personal observations can contribute to formal, published research. It's called "citizen science".

Continue Reading