The Science of Sustainability

Tag: Biology

The System of Surface Water

The System of Surface Water

Explore the ribbons of rivers that crisscross the U.S. and deliver drinking water to more than 117 million people every day.

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Fish Earbones Provide a Rare Glimpse into the Past and Future of Fisheries

Fish Earbones Provide a Rare Glimpse into the Past and Future of Fisheries

Archiving artifacts from the sea, a natural history museum preserves precious data for scientists.

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Rethinking Reproductive Biology

Rethinking Reproductive Biology

Everyone knows that women are born with all the eggs they can ever make, right? Well, a recent study shows that everyone just might be wrong.

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Science Fair for the Rest of Us

Science Fair for the Rest of Us

If you want to do a science fair project, one of the best places to do one in the South Bay is at Schmahl Science.

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Feeling Biocurious? How To Get Your DIY Bio On

Feeling Biocurious? How To Get Your DIY Bio On

Maybe you have an idea to make bacteria that can sense or even break down mercury in the environment. Or you just always wanted to do some biology. Where can you turn?

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The Open Science Movement

The Open Science Movement

Scientists do all the work pretty much in secrecy until they are ready to present a polished story. They then present their results to each other in a language only they can understand.

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Learning About Life Through Real-Time Biotic Video Games

Learning About Life Through Real-Time Biotic Video Games

Imagine a world where games could influence the actions of others. A team at Stanford has taken the first step towards creating biotic games.

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Tiny Lichen Point to Bigger Pollution Problems in Yosemite

Tiny Lichen Point to Bigger Pollution Problems in Yosemite

Air pollution may seem like an urban problem, but it’s becoming an increasing concern in California’s national parks.

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Home Sweet Serpentine

Home Sweet Serpentine

Serpentine soil is a tough environment, but some unique plants and animals call it home.

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Sin and Biology

Sin and Biology

What do scientists think about sin? I’ve recently read a book that provided an interesting connection between the biological idea of evolution and sin.

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Reporter's Notes: Building an Artificial Leaf

Reporter's Notes: Building an Artificial Leaf

When I began this story, it seemed pretty simple. I'd heard that scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab were working to mimic photosynthesis and create a man-made version of the process that could supply us with renewable energy.

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Science Event Pick: Experimenting with Yourself

Science Event Pick: Experimenting with Yourself

David experimenting with EEGLoyal KQED blog followers have been reading of Dr. Barry Starr’s experience getting his genes tested by 23andMe. He has tested his native American ancestry and evaluated his risk for diabetes. What if Barry took even more tests, from blood toxins to more genetic tests – would that result in a clearer […]

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Science Event Pick: Stardust in our Bones

Science Event Pick: Stardust in our Bones

David Lindberg, Professor of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley, and Steve Croft, postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Astronomy at UC Berkeley will tie these great anniversaries in a unique lecture this weekend.

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Producer's Notes: Decoding Synthetic Biology

Producer's Notes: Decoding Synthetic Biology

Synthetic biology portends big changes in our lives by ushering in a dizzying array of applications in everything from medicine to biofuels, environmental remediation to agriculture.

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Reporter's Notes: Stem Cells and Horses

Reporter's Notes: Stem Cells and Horses

Performance horses at his level can be worth $60,000 and more. Training, too, is an enormous investment. "Gretchen," as we call her in the piece, has spent years training Disney in English dressage.

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Reporter's Notes: Sudden Oak Death

Reporter's Notes: Sudden Oak Death

There is no proven cure for Sudden Oak Death. But that doesn't mean you can't find people selling cures. In fact, the Internet is full of theories – and their related products – that explain how to treat Sudden Oak Death. The problem with them, says UC Berkeley researcher Matteo Garbelotto, is that they don't work. And in fact, he adds, they could actually harm people's backyard oak trees.

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Reporter's Notes: Medicine from the Ocean Floor

Reporter's Notes: Medicine from the Ocean Floor

Scientists gather samples on the ocean floor. Credit: Roger Linington.There's nothing new about looking to nature to cure disease – we've been doing it for thousands of years, with good results. (Two recent examples: The active ingredient in aspirin was first identified in the bark of the willow tree. And we have the Pacific yew […]

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Producer's Notes: Animal Chefs

Producer's Notes: Animal Chefs

Few images will stay as indelibly with me as the sight of a 500 pound grizzly bear devouring a horse bone while standing waist high in water.

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Predicting Fossil Finds

Predicting Fossil Finds

Scientists used evolutionary theory to figure out where to find the bones of this fishibian. Lately I have been reading Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution is True. And so far it is a fascinating read. What is so great about this book for a scientist is that it gives the big picture on evolution. This sort […]

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Happy Birthday Charlie!

Happy Birthday Charlie!

This month marks the 200th birthday of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of "On the Origin of Species". If Darwin were alive today, I think he would be very pleased.

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