The Science of Sustainability

Tag: Astronomy

Solar Maximum: Fizzle, or Finale Yet to Come?

Solar Maximum: Fizzle, or Finale Yet to Come?

Has the sun's predicted Solar Maximum in magnetic activity ended early and after a disappointing performance–or is it getting ready to delivery a spectacular finale and a double-peak Solarmax?

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Touch the Sun at Chabot Space & Science Center

Touch the Sun at Chabot Space & Science Center

Just in time for the imminent event of Solar Maximum, Chabot Space & Science Center is opening a new solar exhibition that features the latest in stunning ultraviolet satellite imagery from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory!

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Ten Random Astro-Facts to Entertain and Boggle

Ten Random Astro-Facts to Entertain and Boggle

I decided that instead of blogging on just one topic in astronomy, I'd blog about ten of them!

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Found In Space: Exoplanet Alpha Centauri Bb

Found In Space: Exoplanet Alpha Centauri Bb

If you've been keeping up on the now very frequent reports of new extrasolar planet discoveries, here's a news flash: an Earth-sized exoplanet has been found orbiting the nearest star!ei

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Black Holes: Objects of Attraction

Black Holes: Objects of Attraction

Black holes have been the stuff of science fiction since their discovery in the late sixties. But now a new, nimble NASA telescope is using its powerful x-ray vision to hunt for these abundant yet invisible, massive space oddities.

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Your Photos on QUEST: Rogelio Bernal Andreo

Your Photos on QUEST: Rogelio Bernal Andreo

Astrophotographer Rogelio Bernal Andreo's colorful wide field images of deep sky objects like galaxies, nebulae, star clusters has garnered him dozens of photography awards including the Royal Observatory of Greenwich's 2010 Best Astrophotographer of the Year.

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Do Constellations Change Over Time?

Do Constellations Change Over Time?

Do the constellations—the patterns made by the stars in the night sky—change over time, and if so, how long have they resembled what we see today?

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Deep, Dark Waters of Titan

Deep, Dark Waters of Titan

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water, NASA finds another ocean for us to worry about — this time on Saturn's moon, Titan.

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Space Telescope to Begin Search for Black Holes

Space Telescope to Begin Search for Black Holes

NASA's newest space telescope, NuStar, will soon begin its hunt for black holes. Scientists are hoping to learn more about how they grow and why they're such messy eaters.

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Voyager: Old Spacecraft, New Frontier?

Voyager: Old Spacecraft, New Frontier?

Thirty-five years after beginning a remarkable journey that started with encounters of Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager 1 may once again be making a historic scientific encounter: the boundary between our Solar System and interstellar space!

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Science on the SPOT: Up all Night with SOFIA, NASA's Flying Observatory

Science on the SPOT: Up all Night with SOFIA, NASA's Flying Observatory

SOFIA is more than a telescope tucked into a re-purposed commercial airliner. It's a complete flying astronomical observation platform which carries a dozen or more astronomers, observers and crew far above the clouds to observe objects and phenomena too cold to be seen in visible light.

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Sizing Up the Earth

Sizing Up the Earth

What has a mass of about 6 yottakilograms, occupies a volume of space of about 1 million million cubic-kilometers, and is about 40 kilometers fatter than it is tall. Guesses, anyone?

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Don't Miss Your Last Chance to See a Transit of Venus on Tuesday

Don't Miss Your Last Chance to See a Transit of Venus on Tuesday

Don't miss the chance to experience history! Tuesday, June 5, 3:04 PM to 9:46 PM PDT, the Transit of Venus. Rare event. Historical scientific significance. Last chance to see it!

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Yuri’s Night in the Bay Area

Yuri’s Night in the Bay Area

51 years ago on April 12th, 1961, the Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin made history as the first human to enter outer space. Exactly 20 years later, the United States innovated the space age by launching the Space Shuttle (April 12th, 1981). Yuri’s Night, which commemorates these events, aims to celebrate humanity’s past present and future in space launches Yuri’s Night celebrations this week around the world.

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Up All Night on NASA's Flying Telescope

Up All Night on NASA's Flying Telescope

The Obama Administration’s new budget for NASA was released last week, and calls for cuts to many space programs. But one California-based project is likely to get more money. The SOFIA flying observatory, a telescope mounted on an airplane, is considered more nimble and cost-effective than other projects. Reporter Lauren Sommer recently caught a ride as it flew over the Pacific Ocean.

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Kepler 22B: Exoplanet Dress-up Doll

Kepler 22B: Exoplanet Dress-up Doll

It's 600 light years from Earth, orbits a star very similar to our Sun in a period of about 290 days, and has a diameter about two and a half times that of Earth. What is it? It's the NASA Kepler mission's most recent exciting confirmed discovery, the extrasolar-planet Kepler 22B.

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Luna Nova: Moon of the Cretaceous Skies

Luna Nova: Moon of the Cretaceous Skies

Although I am a lifelong fan of science, I’ve also been a lifelong fan of science fiction—so I sometimes experience conflict on the borderlands where the two meet.

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The Juno Mission: Interview With NASA Scientist Dr. Bill Cooke

The Juno Mission: Interview With NASA Scientist Dr. Bill Cooke

What's old, is new again. Dr. Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, discusses how the historical astro-photographic plates at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) contribute to the new Juno mission to Jupiter.

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Yo GAMMA GAMMA:  Photo plates enable astronomers to peer back to the future

Yo GAMMA GAMMA: Photo plates enable astronomers to peer back to the future

Dr. Michael Castelaz, the Science Director at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, knows GAMMA II is a sleeping giant. He just needs a little help waking up the beast.

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"Looking Up" – studying comets with the JUNO mission

"Looking Up" – studying comets with the JUNO mission

Herbert Mehnert a Cline Scholar at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute spent his summer researching Comet Photometry and Morphology. Herbert was introduced to PARI by one of his college professors and jumped at the opportunity to work at the former NASA research institute.

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