The Science of Sustainability

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Geological Outings Around the Bay: Los Trancos Open Space

Geological Outings Around the Bay: Los Trancos Open Space

Lidar mapping unveils one of the Bay Area's best places to visit the San Andreas fault.

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Trophy Hunting: For the Love of Blood and Money

Trophy Hunting: For the Love of Blood and Money

Trophy hunters routinely pay thousands of dollars for the chance to kill big game like caribou, moose, black bear and especially grizzly bear. Trophy hunting narratives boast a love of nature. But some sociologists find a different story.

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Nothing "Fishy" About Sustainable Seafood

Nothing "Fishy" About Sustainable Seafood

Learn about what we can do to take care of our oceans, both for the fish and ourselves.

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Earthquake Landslides: A Widespread Hazard

Earthquake Landslides: A Widespread Hazard

Earthquakes will always produce landslides, but new knowledge will help us deal with them better.

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Tracing the Origins of the Durian’s Stench

Tracing the Origins of the Durian’s Stench

Researchers in Germany have identified compounds in durian that might be responsible for its unique smell.

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New Clues to Our Ancestors' Mobility

New Clues to Our Ancestors' Mobility

Australopithecus afarensis (the species of the well-known “Lucy” skeleton) was an upright walking species, but the question of whether it also spent much of its time in trees has been hotly debated for 30+ years, partly because a complete set of A. afarensis shoulder blades has never before been available for study.

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Ten Random Astro-Facts to Entertain and Boggle

Ten Random Astro-Facts to Entertain and Boggle

I decided that instead of blogging on just one topic in astronomy, I'd blog about ten of them!

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Watching the Atmospheric Rivers Flow

Watching the Atmospheric Rivers Flow

Researchers are gearing up to monitor the flood-causing weather monsters known as atmospheric rivers.

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Frankenstein vs. Godzilla:  What’s in Your Cereal Bowl?

Frankenstein vs. Godzilla: What’s in Your Cereal Bowl?

In all of the recent discussion about genetically modified (GM) foods here in California, we’ve overlooked regular foods and how new traits are found (or created) in them. There isn’t usually a monk lovingly breeding peas in the Austrian countryside somewhere. Instead, more often than not, there is someone blasting a seed with radiation and/or harmful chemicals.

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Playing Whack-a-Mole with Flame Retardants

Playing Whack-a-Mole with Flame Retardants

Countless consumer products sold in California contain a flame retardant flagged as a possible carcinogen nearly 35 years ago. As of this week, finally, they must carry a warning that the chemical causes cancer. But is it enough when manufacturers simply replace one toxic chemical with another?

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Creepy Yet Compelling: Blood Vessels Blown in Glass

Creepy Yet Compelling: Blood Vessels Blown in Glass

Halloween means time for gore! Blood, bones, brains and more! Severed fingers, severed toes, eyeballs and organs galore! But how accurate are all these loose bits of human anatomy in our front yards, costumes and punch bowls? Can we use that skeleton in the corner to bone up for a biology exam–or are we missing out on a tremendous opportunity to learn medical science?

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Science Behind Vampire Myths

Science Behind Vampire Myths

Why have people around the world always been fascinated by vampires? Did vampire tales begin as a way to explain frightening phenomena actually witnessed? Although there is no scientific evidence for vampires, there is some scientific basis for vampire folklore.

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Owls Around Us

Owls Around Us

Many species of owls share our neighborhoods and parks. Learn more about them on a virtual walk through Redwood Regional Park.

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More Clues About Singing Sand

More Clues About Singing Sand

New research shows that sand can sing by itself, but if so, then why are singing sand dunes so rare?

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Women in Science: Meet a Mathematician, a Physicist and a Geologist Through Art

Women in Science: Meet a Mathematician, a Physicist and a Geologist Through Art

There's nothing like role models for inspiring the scientific spirits of women, today and tomorrow! And Marie Curie isn't the only one out there–history is rife with lesser-known but no less fabulous female scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.

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Be HEARD: A Rare Disease Science Challenge To Find Cures

Be HEARD: A Rare Disease Science Challenge To Find Cures

Curing or even finding treatments for rare diseases is hard. Not necessarily because these diseases are any more complex than more common ones. It has more to do with the fact that there is very little profit to be made in helping people with these diseases.

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Found In Space: Exoplanet Alpha Centauri Bb

Found In Space: Exoplanet Alpha Centauri Bb

If you've been keeping up on the now very frequent reports of new extrasolar planet discoveries, here's a news flash: an Earth-sized exoplanet has been found orbiting the nearest star!ei

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A New Radiocarbon Yardstick from Japan

A New Radiocarbon Yardstick from Japan

A long core of sediment from a Japanese lake is a Rosetta Stone for ice-age climate research.

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Vaccine Waivers, Informed Consent and Public Health

Vaccine Waivers, Informed Consent and Public Health

Starting in 2014, California will require parents to see a health practitioner to learn the risks and benefits of vaccination before opting out of the state's immunization requirements. Public health officials hope that when parents learn the difference between science-based evidence and the uninformed myths so prevalent online and in the mainstream media, they'll decide to protect their children from the real risks of infectious disease, rather than worry about unfounded theoretical risks.

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Information Is Beautiful Competition: San Francisco Design Company Takes Top Prize

Information Is Beautiful Competition: San Francisco Design Company Takes Top Prize

The Bay Area is a magnet for both artistic spirits and data freaks. So, although the inaugural Information is Beautiful award competition drew entries from around the world, perhaps it isn't too surprising that the ultimate prize was snagged by San Francisco design company Stamen.

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