The Science of Sustainability

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Genetic Sleuthing, Or How To Catch The Right Identical Twin Criminal

Genetic Sleuthing, Or How To Catch The Right Identical Twin Criminal

There are unique DNA differences between identical twins that scientists can use to tell them apart. Why isn't law enforcement using these differences to catch their criminal? Because the cost is too high.

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The Mars Rover Curiosity Digs a Little Deeper

The Mars Rover Curiosity Digs a Little Deeper

On February 8th, the rover Curiosity used its drill to bore a hole into a slab of flat bedrock, marking the first time we have probed deeply into the interior of a Martian rock in search of the secrets of Mars' past it may hold.

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Infrasound Takes a Bow

Infrasound Takes a Bow

Last week's events pushed the obscure subject of infrasound into the news. That was music to my science-obsessed ears.

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Book Review: Animal Wise – The Thoughts and Emotions of Our Fellow Creatures

Book Review: Animal Wise – The Thoughts and Emotions of Our Fellow Creatures

An appreciation of the rich inner lives of nonhuman animals dates back at least to Aristotle and gained support from Charles Darwin, who saw any differences between humans and other animals as a matter of degree, not kind. Still, the notion that humans stand above and apart from our fellow creatures dies hard. In her new book, "Animal Wise," science journalist Virginia Morell takes us on a tour of labs and field sites around the world to show us that many of the traits once thought uniquely human appear in even our most distant evolutionary relatives.

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Are Sleeping Aids Effective or Just A Placebo Effect?

Are Sleeping Aids Effective or Just A Placebo Effect?

Insomnia has become a major health concern worldwide. In the US, 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills are issued each year and non-benzodiazepines are the most commonly prescribed type. However, recent scientific journal articles have raised concerns about using these sleep aids.

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Asteroid 2012 DA14: In Line For a Rim Shot

Asteroid 2012 DA14: In Line For a Rim Shot

Duck! Here comes asteroid 2012 DA14, grazing close to where you live on February 15th!

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Bay Area Bird Challenge: The Great Backyard Bird Count Is This Weekend!

Bay Area Bird Challenge: The Great Backyard Bird Count Is This Weekend!

Help the Bay Area be better represented in this year's Great Backyard Bird Count!

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Romantic Spots for Bay Area Geologists (and Those Who Love Them)

Romantic Spots for Bay Area Geologists (and Those Who Love Them)

Don't be surprised, be delighted if your current or future romantic partner treats you to a day straight up on the rocks.

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Lighten Up, California: Why GloFish Can't Glow in the Golden State

Lighten Up, California: Why GloFish Can't Glow in the Golden State

One of the more popular exhibits at The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose is the wetlab. The exhibit is getting a little long in the tooth so I was looking for ways to give it a bit of a refresh.

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Geological Sounds

Geological Sounds

Geology can be heard as well as seen: here's a tour of some sounds that Earth makes.

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Coyote Killings: A Complex Debate of Conservation and Cruelty

Coyote Killings: A Complex Debate of Conservation and Cruelty

Coyotes, reviled for preying on sheep and goats, are the most targeted predator in the U.S. This week, hunters in the tiny Modoc County town of Adin will compete in a contest to kill the most coyotes to protect their livestock–even though research shows that killing coyotes results in higher reproductive rates.

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Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

UC Berkeley's University Herbarium boasts one of the largest and oldest collections of seaweed in the United States. Herbarium curator Kathy Ann Miller is leading a massive project to preserve digitally nearly 80,000 specimens of west coast seaweed.

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Winter Waterfall Hiking in Marin

Winter Waterfall Hiking in Marin

Winter may not bring snow to the San Francisco Bay Area, but it definitely brings waterfalls. If you find time before spring, head to Cataract Creek Trail in Marin County.

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Groundhogs and Ground Squirrels: Winter Prognosticators

Groundhogs and Ground Squirrels: Winter Prognosticators

Ground squirrels in our local parks and grasslands are related to groundhogs. Find out more about their role in weather predictions and grassland ecology.

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What Makes California's Quake Warning System So Timely?

What Makes California's Quake Warning System So Timely?

In the age-old war between Northern and Southern California, a change in the science has changed the politics.

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Comments Do Matter (So Get Talking!)

Comments Do Matter (So Get Talking!)

Back in December I wrote a blog post asking scientists to comment online more often.

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Mars Mountain Climbing Mashup!

Mars Mountain Climbing Mashup!

The comparison between Earth-side mountain exploration and the planned expedition by the Mars rover Curiosity came to my mind as I read a book my family got me over the holidays: Last Climb, the story of the legendary Mount Everest expeditions of George Leigh Mallory.

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Geological Outings Around the Bay: San Bruno Mountain

Geological Outings Around the Bay: San Bruno Mountain

There is no Bay Area peak more central than San Bruno Mountain, and it's remarkably unspoiled.

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Fear and Loathing in Wolf Country

Fear and Loathing in Wolf Country

After federal wildlife officials removed endangered species protections on wolves in the Rocky Mountains, hunters quickly killed them by the hundreds. If California's lone wolf leaves the state, he could meet a similar fate.

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Warblers' Secrets for Successful Survival Strategies

Warblers' Secrets for Successful Survival Strategies

Learn the survival secrets of our winter visitors, the yellow-rumped warblers.

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