The Science of Sustainability

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Landslide at the Calaveras Reservoir

Landslide at the Calaveras Reservoir

The long-running dam replacement project must pause to deal with a sleeping monster.

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Do Now #74: Earth Day

Do Now #74: Earth Day

Calling all students on this Earth Day: Do you make it a regular practice to care for the environment? If so, what do you do? If not, why?

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Fund Basic Research, It’s For Your Own Good

Fund Basic Research, It’s For Your Own Good

The budget proposal by the Obama administration is a mixed bag in terms of funding for science.

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Two Local Kids Are Semi-Finalists in a National Wildlife Art Contest

Two Local Kids Are Semi-Finalists in a National Wildlife Art Contest

A pair of local young artists have won a big environmental prize.

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Resurrection Biology: The Reality of Bringing Back Extinct Species

Resurrection Biology: The Reality of Bringing Back Extinct Species

There has been a lot of buzz of late about bringing back extinct species like mammoths or passenger pigeons. While it might be a good idea to start thinking about these possibilities, we are years or even decades away from being able to actually pull this off with most long dead animals. The problem isn’t […]

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Gliese 667 Cc: Musing the Possibilities of Another Earth

Gliese 667 Cc: Musing the Possibilities of Another Earth

Since the first extra-solar planet was found in 1992, we've made some decent progress in exploring other worlds out there, and may even be zeroing in on that "other Earth."

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Scientists Celebrate a Long-Dead Whale

Scientists Celebrate a Long-Dead Whale

Why is a rotting whale on the Antarctic seafloor exciting to geologists?

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Yes, Your Cell Phone Conversation Does Drive People Mad

Yes, Your Cell Phone Conversation Does Drive People Mad

It's well known that talking on your cell phone compromises your ability to perform simple tasks like walking and driving. Now it turns out cell phones impact cognition in bystanders as well: listening to another person talk on their cell phone isn't just incredibly annoying, it also interferes with your memory and concentration.

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Rescuing Injured Wildlife

Rescuing Injured Wildlife

Wild birds, injured on the beach, get a helping hand from dedicated staff and volunteers. Here's the story of one injured water bird.

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The Ant-Driven Landscape

The Ant-Driven Landscape

Invasive ant species have powerful—and poorly known—effects on a region's soil.

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Engineering a Virus-Free Future

Engineering a Virus-Free Future

I have been reading a book called "Regenesis" where in one part the authors propose a way to re-engineer the human race so all people are resistant to all viruses, known and unknown. This will theoretically be possible in the next few decades (or even sooner) and, if done right, is predicted to make us resistant for a very long time and possibly even forever.

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How Big is Your World?

How Big is Your World?

Is the universe really so big, or are we just very, very small?

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Still Mining Gold in the Golden State

Still Mining Gold in the Golden State

California is not yet finished producing the gold that made it wealthy and famous.

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Arsenic and Old Wells

Arsenic and Old Wells

Six years after the EPA's new arsenic rule for drinking water went into effect, poor communities in the San Joaquin Valley—who can’t afford the costs of complying with the stricter standard—face the highest risk of exposure to unsafe arsenic levels.

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Two Species, One Nest: CuriOdyssey's Animal Odd Couple

Two Species, One Nest: CuriOdyssey's Animal Odd Couple

As spring approaches, an egret and a heron have been hard at work preparing for their future brood…together. This will mark the sixth year that "Jabby," a snowy egret (Egretta thula), and "Lefty," a black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) have nested as a pair at CuriOdyssey (formerly Coyote Point Museum) in San Mateo.

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Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive Species: They're Here and More on the Way

Invasive species are here and more are on the way! Find out about the problems and some possible solutions.

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Side Trips from Interstate 5: Kettleman Hills

Side Trips from Interstate 5: Kettleman Hills

This side trip takes you into the quiet range of hills that runs along the freeway south of Coalinga.

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Genetic Sleuthing, Or How To Catch The Right Identical Twin Criminal

Genetic Sleuthing, Or How To Catch The Right Identical Twin Criminal

There are unique DNA differences between identical twins that scientists can use to tell them apart. Why isn't law enforcement using these differences to catch their criminal? Because the cost is too high.

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The Mars Rover Curiosity Digs a Little Deeper

The Mars Rover Curiosity Digs a Little Deeper

On February 8th, the rover Curiosity used its drill to bore a hole into a slab of flat bedrock, marking the first time we have probed deeply into the interior of a Martian rock in search of the secrets of Mars' past it may hold.

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Infrasound Takes a Bow

Infrasound Takes a Bow

Last week's events pushed the obscure subject of infrasound into the news. That was music to my science-obsessed ears.

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