The Science of Sustainability

Physics

All Charged Up Over EMFs

All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can't live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow down, as Amy Standen reports.

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Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs

Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can’t live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow down, as Amy Standen reports.

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New Laser Could Create Atomic "Movies"

New Laser Could Create Atomic "Movies"

The world's first X-ray laser could help scientists develop new energy sources and pharmaceuticals.

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Homegrown Particle Accelerators

Homegrown Particle Accelerators

QUEST journeys back to find out how physicists on the UC Berkeley campus in the 1930s, and at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in the 1970s, created "atom smashers" that led to key discoveries about the tiny constituents of the atom and paved the way for the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

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Producer's Notes: Homegrown Particle Accelerators

Producer's Notes: Homegrown Particle Accelerators

If you’re enthralled by the Large Hadron Collider, you’ll want to watch QUEST’s story on atom smashers.

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QUEST Lab: Bridge Thermometer

QUEST Lab: Bridge Thermometer

The roadway across the Golden Gate Bridge rises and falls as much as 16 feet depending on the temperature. When the sun hits the bridge, the metal expands and the bridge cables stretch. As the fog rolls in, the cables contract and the bridge goes up. Curators from the Outdoor Exploratorium in San Francisco have set up a scope two miles away so you can see how the bridge is moving up or down depending on the weather.

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QUEST Lab: Speed of Sound

QUEST Lab: Speed of Sound

Along with cable cars and seagulls, the Golden Gate Bridge foghorn is one of San Francisco's most iconic sounds. But did you know that if you hear that foghorn off in the distance, you can calculate how many miles you are from the bridge? Using the Speed of Sound exhibit at the Outdoor Exploratorium at Fort Mason, Shawn Lani shows us how sound perception is affected by distance.

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The New Bay Bridge: Earthquake Makeover

The New Bay Bridge: Earthquake Makeover

The new self-anchored suspension bridge being built to replace the vulnerable eastern span of the Bay Bridge is scheduled to open in 2013 and will be seismically and aesthetically revolutionary in its design. QUEST explores the engineering features that will give the new bridge the strength and flexibility to withstand the next "big one."

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Behind the Scenes with the Mythbusters

Behind the Scenes with the Mythbusters

Guest blogger Michael Kadel chronicles our behind-the-scenes visit to our explosive San Francisco neighbors, the Mythbusters.

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Sun-Earth Day: Magnetic Magic

Sun-Earth Day: Magnetic Magic

Saturday, March 20th, was not only Vernal Equinox, but the annual Sun-Earth Day: a NASA-promoted effort around the country to focus attention on the special connections between the Sun and the Earth. This year's theme: magnetism!

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The Godfather of Green

The Godfather of Green

Art Rosenfeld is retiring, stepping down from his post with the California Energy Commission. The 83-year-old nuclear physicist pushed California to enact some of the toughest energy efficiency standards in the world. QUEST talks with Rosenfeld about his passion for saving kilowatts. Andrea Kissack reports.

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Reporter's Notes: The Godfather of Green

Reporter's Notes: The Godfather of Green

My head is swimming with energy efficiency facts after producing this week's QUEST radio piece on efficiency guru Art Rosenfeld. Rosenfeld is retiring, stepping down after two terms on the California Energy Commission.

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Try These At Home 2: Exploring Buoyancy

Try These At Home 2: Exploring Buoyancy

Buoyancy is the force that decides whether an object will sink or float, and has had a long and colorful history.

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Welcome to the Year of the Laser

Welcome to the Year of the Laser

Perhaps no single development of the last century has been more influential or more important than the laser.

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Dark Matter Tests Positive (Sort of)

Dark Matter Tests Positive (Sort of)

Dark matter – think of matter as a fancy word for stuff – is one of the most exciting but also potentially frustrating phenomena in cosmology today.

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Web Extra: Photosynthesis and Foosball

Web Extra: Photosynthesis and Foosball

Photosynthesis seems like a simple process, but scientists are still trying to understand how it works. They've discovered that plants may be using quantum physics. As Lauren Sommer found out, the best way to understand it is through foosball.

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Unlocking the Mysteries of Graphene

Unlocking the Mysteries of Graphene

Researchers in Alex Zettl’s group at Berkeley have endeavored recently to isolate suspended membranes of graphene for study and image them at Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s TEAM 0.5, the world’s most powerful transmission electron microscope (TEM).

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50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom

50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom

50 years ago, eminent physicist Richard Feynman gave a gave a prophetic speech at Caltech entitled, "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom." The speech described a rich world of possibilities that could arise if we only applied ourselves toward controlling matter on smaller and smaller scales.

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Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who use phenomena such as exploding stars and gravitational lenses to explore the dark cosmos.

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The Large Hadron Collider Gets Ready to Spin Again

The Large Hadron Collider Gets Ready to Spin Again

.In about one month the world’s biggest science experiment, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, will once again fire up.

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