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Can PTSD Nightmares Be Cured?

Can PTSD Nightmares Be Cured?

The hallmark of a healthy dream is its weirdness. PTSD dreams, in contrast, are like a broken record, the same, real-life event, played over and over again, in some patients, for decades.

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Porpoises Return to San Francisco Bay

Porpoises Return to San Francisco Bay

Harbor porpoises haven’t been seen in San Francisco Bay for more than 60 years. Now, they’re returning in growing numbers and researchers are working to understand why.

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HIV: Searching For a Cure

HIV: Searching For a Cure

As we approach World AIDS Day, QUEST's Andrea Kissack talks with one of the world's top HIV/AIDS researchers about progress in the search to find a cure.

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Is High-Speed Rail Grinding to a Halt?

Is High-Speed Rail Grinding to a Halt?

In 2008, high speed rail seemed like a game changer, the kind of "Big Idea" that California is famous for. But three years later, the plan is in serious trouble.

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From Swords to Test Tubes: The Million Veteran Program

From Swords to Test Tubes: The Million Veteran Program

A massive database like what the VA is building would allow scientists to compare thousands of anonymous medical records with just a few keystrokes, to study conditions such as cancer and PTSD.

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"A Big, Captivating Idea": The Bay Area Ridge Trail

"A Big, Captivating Idea": The Bay Area Ridge Trail

Like the great pyramids of Egypt, the 550-mile Ridge Trail will take generations to complete. Think of it as a local Appalachian Trail for the current crop of two-year olds.

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The Amazing Transformation of San Francisco's "Sludge Puddle"

The Amazing Transformation of San Francisco's "Sludge Puddle"

Dumping garbage into the bay wasn’t only convenient, it served the larger goal of getting rid of the bay entirely.

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In a Sea of Energy Data, Utilities Try to Inspire Conservation

In a Sea of Energy Data, Utilities Try to Inspire Conservation

Smart meters are providing California households with their hourly and daily energy use information for the first time. Consumers use less electricity, studies have shown, when they can see that data. But getting them to pay attention to energy in the first place may be the biggest hurdle.

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Clean Tech Earns Its Stripes

Clean Tech Earns Its Stripes

The largest energy user in the United States is the U.S. Military. Its annual energy bill runs about $15 billion dollars a year, which is why the Department of Defense has developed a keen interest in finding other ways to meet its energy needs, including investing in alternative energy.

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As Renewables Boom, California Struggles to Quit Coal

As Renewables Boom, California Struggles to Quit Coal

California is known for its "green" reputation, so it might be a surprise that residents in Southern California still depend on coal power when they turn on the lights.

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Climate Change Could Mean Cloudy Future for Lake Tahoe

Climate Change Could Mean Cloudy Future for Lake Tahoe

Over the last 15 years, more than a billion dollars has been spent to protect Lake Tahoe's clear waters from runoff and erosion. Now, new threats to lake's clarity are emerging, just as restoration funding is drying up.

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The Lost Lagoon

The Lost Lagoon

Oakland Museum curator Christopher Richard and geologist Janet Sowers function as water detectives, looking for clues of the city’s long-lost aquatic past. Recently, they believe, they solved a mystery that had nagged them for years.

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California Gets New Environmental Chief

California Gets New Environmental Chief

California's new environmental chief is in the first month of his new position. With budget cuts, environmental lawsuits and a mandate to cut green house gasses, Matt Rodriquez has a big job in front of him.

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From Tunnel to Tap: Quake-Proofing Our Water Supply

From Tunnel to Tap: Quake-Proofing Our Water Supply

The Bay Area's vast Hetchy Hetchy system, "a dream in granite, concrete, and steel," is getting an overhaul. The system carries water 167 miles from Yosemite to Bay Area taps; pretty soon that voyage will include the Bay's first true tunnel.

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Rough Waters for Sea Level Rise Planning

Rough Waters for Sea Level Rise Planning

What do Bay Area airports and some big Silicon Valley companies have in common? They sit right on the edge of San Francisco Bay, where sea level rise is expected to have a big impact by the end of the century.

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Architecture for the Birds

Architecture for the Birds

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as many as one billion birds die each year in collisions with man-made structures. Recently, lawmakers have started to do something about this problem.

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Gulls Threaten South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Work

Gulls Threaten South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Work

One of the most ambitious wetland restoration projects in the country is underway in San Francisco Bay. Thousands of acres of those ponds are being restored for shorebirds and wildlife.

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Boom Times For The Recycling Industry

Boom Times For The Recycling Industry

Here's one silver lining to a slow economy: High recycling rates. Americans are wasting far less, and recycling far more. Nowhere is the trend as strong as in California. As Amy Standen reports, this change is sending ripple effects throughout the economy.

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Resolving Clouds in Climate Change Models

Resolving Clouds in Climate Change Models

As supercomputers grow, so does their energy appetite. Researchers are trying to solve that problem by using a smaller, more pervasive technology.

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Supercomputers Hit an Energy Wall

Supercomputers Hit an Energy Wall

As supercomputers grow, so does their energy appetite. Researchers are trying to solve that problem by using a smaller, more pervasive technology.

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