The Science of Sustainability

Health

Vitamin D Deficiency Common In Skin Cancer Patients

Vitamin D Deficiency Common In Skin Cancer Patients

New research from Stanford University suggests that dermatologists must be aware that their recommendations to avoid sun exposure, particularly for patients at high risk of skin cancer, may be inadvertently creating other health problems.

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A National Expo of Science

A National Expo of Science

This past weekend, I was on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. with a notebook and a very good pair of walking shoes. I spent the weekend exploring the inaugural expo of the USA Science and Engineering Festival.

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Dried Plum Consumption Induces Bone Growth In Older Mice

Dried Plum Consumption Induces Bone Growth In Older Mice

New research from the UC San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center shows that eating high doses of dried plums (prunes) increases bone volume in adult and elderly male mice.

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When Brains Hit The Gym

When Brains Hit The Gym

Can brain performance be improved? The $300 million-a-year "brain-fitness" industry is betting that the answer to that question is yes. Some companies say that an 80-year old brain can perform just as well as a 25-year old brain after some specialized video game training. What about crossword puzzles and regular old exercise? QUEST takes a look at the growing brain fitness industry and the science behind it.

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When Brains Hit the Gym

When Brains Hit the Gym

The general idea is that by doing a series of basic and repetitive tasks, which get harder over time, you’re actually changing your brain structure. Over time, the manufacturers claim, you can train an old brain to behave like a new one. But many scientists who study aging are skeptical.

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Alice Waters' School Lunch Initiative Effective At Instilling Healthy Habits In Children

Alice Waters' School Lunch Initiative Effective At Instilling Healthy Habits In Children

A recent report issued by scientists from the Atkins Center for Weight and Health at UC Berkeley examined the impact of the School Lunch Initiative (SLI) on the eating behaviors of children transitioning from elementary school to middle school.

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Health Officials to Consider Tightening Vaccine Exemptions

Health Officials to Consider Tightening Vaccine Exemptions

Concerned by the increase in the number of children who are starting kindergarten without all their vaccines, public health officials in the Bay Area will look into the possibility of tightening the system that allows parents to opt out from mandatory immunizations.

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Reporter's Notes: Greening Your Drive

Reporter's Notes: Greening Your Drive

In my search for a greener car, I have considered biodiesel, hydrogen, and even clean diesel. What looks most promising to me, however, are low and zero operating emission plug-in vehicles.

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San Francisco Among Top Cities For HIV Testing

San Francisco Among Top Cities For HIV Testing

New CDC survey shows that San Francisco has been successful in getting HIV-positive men tested.

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Scientists Work on New Artificial Kidney

Scientists Work on New Artificial Kidney

A UCSF scientists is leading a team of nearly forty scientists across the nation to develop the world’s first artificial implantable kidney.

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Writer Irwin Silber Dies; Was Featured in QUEST TV Story

Writer Irwin Silber Dies; Was Featured in QUEST TV Story

Oakland writer Irwin Silber died last week. He and his wife, singer Barbara Dane, were featured on a QUEST TV story about Alzheimer's disease.

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California Takes the Lead on Stem Cell Research

California Takes the Lead on Stem Cell Research

A judge's ruling last month that blocks the federal government from funding embryonic stem cell research puts California back in the lead in the field.

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Reporter's Notes: California Takes the Lead on Stem Cell Research

Reporter's Notes: California Takes the Lead on Stem Cell Research

Deepak Srivastava – profiled in this week's radio story – is no stranger to QUEST. Just last month, Srivastava made headlines when he announced that his lab had successfully created beating heart cells from adult cells.

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All Charged Up Over EMFs

All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can't live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow down, as Amy Standen reports.

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Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs

Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can’t live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow down, as Amy Standen reports.

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EPA Enters Debate Over Toxic Strawberry Fumigant

EPA Enters Debate Over Toxic Strawberry Fumigant

The Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing scientific assessments of a controversial strawberry fumigant scheduled for use in California, as well as opening up a public comment period on the toxic pesticide, according to U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein and the environmental law group Earthjustice.

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Major Breakthrough in Reviving Heart Cells

Major Breakthrough in Reviving Heart Cells

Scientists reported today that they have succeeded for the first time in creating beating heart cells from other types of adult cells.

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Poi Origins

Poi Origins

This Monday I started a refresher course in Poi dancing. Poi is a performance art using two balls suspended on ropes a person holds in their hands and swings in a variety of circular patterns.

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Whooping Cough Epidemic Exposes Holes in California's Immunization System

Whooping Cough Epidemic Exposes Holes in California's Immunization System

The whooping cough epidemic that has killed six babies and made an estimated 1,500 people sick in California this year is exposing holes in the state’s immunization system, which leaders in the public health community are now racing to patch.

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Legalize Marijuana–Save Our Houses?

Legalize Marijuana–Save Our Houses?

Are high energy use and a rotting housing stock in the North more reasons to legalize, regulate, and tax marijuana for anyone?

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