The Science of Sustainability

Health

Toxic Algae on the Loose

Toxic Algae on the Loose

Another mysterious fish die-off happened in a Southern California harbor last week. Scientists are still trying to figure out what caused six tons of sardines to go belly-up in Ventura. Those sardines tested positive for a neurotoxin caused by algae blooms. Meanwhile, commercial shellfish growers say they're noticing some strange patterns as well, as Amy Standen reports.

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Exercise May Protect Against Stress-Related Cellular Aging

Exercise May Protect Against Stress-Related Cellular Aging

New research by Nobel Prize winning UCSF researcher, Elizabeth Blackburn, provides a possible mechanism by which exercise protects against stress-related chromosome aging.

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DON'T PANIC (but a tiny bit of radiation was found in U.S. milk)

DON'T PANIC (but a tiny bit of radiation was found in U.S. milk)

"Minuscule" amounts of iodine-131 was found in milk from Washington state.

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Don't Worry, Be Happy, Die Early

Don't Worry, Be Happy, Die Early

Happiness is tied to good health later in life, but childhood happiness does not predict longevity—in fact it does the opposite, according to a new report.

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Community Action Agencies Continue to Fight for Low-Income Families

Community Action Agencies Continue to Fight for Low-Income Families

Government works when it is directed towards helping its citizens live healthy and productive lives.

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Life-Threatening Mushroom Poisoning

Life-Threatening Mushroom Poisoning

Since Northern California's mushroom season began last September, four people have suffered life-threatening injuries after eating poisonous wild mushrooms.

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Missing Gene Suggests Rodents Aren't The Best Model For Diabetes Research

Missing Gene Suggests Rodents Aren't The Best Model For Diabetes Research

Rodents and other mammals might not be ideal for studying type 2 diabetes because of a gene that was deleted from the human genome millions of years ago.

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The Heroic Imagination Project

The Heroic Imagination Project

40 years ago, Stanford psychology professor Phillip Zimbardo's notorious Stanford Prison Experiment demonstrated how good people can do evil things. Now, his "Heroic Imagination Project" takes those lessons to an Oakland high school to see if heroes can also be made.

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Can Heroes Be Made?

Can Heroes Be Made?

If there is one thing Stanford Professor Phillip Zimbardo is known for, it's that normal people can be turned into sadists. Can he leave a more optimistic legacy and prove the opposite to be true?

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Scientists Understand Heart Disease Better, Still Give Bad Advice

Scientists Understand Heart Disease Better, Still Give Bad Advice

High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets have been used to treat high triglycerides since the 1960s.

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Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

After a series of high-profile recalls, the FDA says it's reconsidering rules that allow cheese makers to use unpasteurized milk in their products. That could mean big changes in Northern California, which has become a hub of artisanal cheese making.

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Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

Pasteurization may kill microbes like e.coli, but, they say, it also kills a cheese’s terroir, the unique taste associated with a particular place.

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Should We Stop Telling People To Lose Weight?

Should We Stop Telling People To Lose Weight?

It makes intuitive sense that shifting focus toward healthy habits and away from body size would be a more effective strategy for long-term health, but fat loss (rather than weight loss) may still be a worthwhile target.

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Sugar To Blame For Increased Heart Disease Risk In Teens

Sugar To Blame For Increased Heart Disease Risk In Teens

Sugar consumption among adolescents has nearly doubled since the 1970s.

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How Nutritious Is Horse? The Other Red Meat

How Nutritious Is Horse? The Other Red Meat

Compared to lean beef, horse meat appears to have some nutritional advantages.

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Visiting the Dentist Chair of the Future

Visiting the Dentist Chair of the Future

It probably goes without saying: the dentist's chair isn't the most popular place to visit. But going the dentist may soon be a very different experience. As Lauren Sommer reports, researchers at the University of California San Francisco are developing new technology that may make dentists' drills less common.

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Visiting the Dentist Chair of the Future

Visiting the Dentist Chair of the Future

It probably goes without saying — the dentist’s chair isn’t the most popular place to visit. But going to the dentist may one day be a very different experience.

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Mistletoe: Friend or Foe?

Mistletoe: Friend or Foe?

Have you been hanging out under the mistletoe at holiday parties, hoping for a kiss? Well, that mistletoe is more than a Christmas kissing custom. It’s a parasite that can harm trees—and a potential treatment for cancer.

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How Jet Lag Resets the Body Clock

How Jet Lag Resets the Body Clock

If you plan to take any long plane trips this holiday season, here are a few things to keep in mind: jet lag, scientists say, often hits women harder than men. The direction you're flying matters, too. Jet lag is worse when traveling from west to east. In fact, studies suggests that jet lag can do a lot more than just wear us out

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D'OH! DHA Supplements Don't Reduce Alzheimer's Risks

D'OH! DHA Supplements Don't Reduce Alzheimer's Risks

Another promising dietary supplement fails to deliver protection against a target disease, this time Alzheimer's.

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