The Science of Sustainability

Health

The Search for Alcoholism's Miracle Drug

The Search for Alcoholism's Miracle Drug

Alcoholism is a very treatable disease, but still, there are some challenges.

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The Science of Pain

The Science of Pain

Pain is the most common reason for trips to the doctor's office. So it makes sense that pain treatment is a huge part of our health care system, costing more than $100 billion dollars a year. But how exactly pain works is still a mystery in many ways. As Lauren Sommer reports, some researchers are trying to understand it better by looking at a very unusual creature.

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The Science of Pain

The Science of Pain

Pain is the most common reason for trips to the doctor's office. But how exactly pain works is still a mystery in many ways.

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Cultural Pressure Encourages Poor Eating Habits In Immigrants

Cultural Pressure Encourages Poor Eating Habits In Immigrants

But the question remains, how do we make healthy eating cool?

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Eating Green

Eating Green

Journalists from around the country learn about sustainable foods at a Monterey Bay Aquarium event.

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Prince Charles Delivers Landmark Speech, Says Sustainable Farming Can Feed The World

Prince Charles Delivers Landmark Speech, Says Sustainable Farming Can Feed The World

Prince Charles is a long-time supporter of organic and sustainable farming, but this speech took his advocacy a step further.

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Will Conventional Produce Lower Your Child's IQ?

Will Conventional Produce Lower Your Child's IQ?

While these women had slightly higher than average pesticide exposure due to their proximity to farming centers, their levels were not out of range of national averages.

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Toxic Algae on the Loose

Toxic Algae on the Loose

California's commercial shellfish growers say there's something fishy going on.

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Toxic Algae on the Loose

Toxic Algae on the Loose

Another mysterious fish die-off happened in a Southern California harbor last week. Scientists are still trying to figure out what caused six tons of sardines to go belly-up in Ventura. Those sardines tested positive for a neurotoxin caused by algae blooms. Meanwhile, commercial shellfish growers say they're noticing some strange patterns as well, as Amy Standen reports.

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Exercise May Protect Against Stress-Related Cellular Aging

Exercise May Protect Against Stress-Related Cellular Aging

New research by Nobel Prize winning UCSF researcher, Elizabeth Blackburn, provides a possible mechanism by which exercise protects against stress-related chromosome aging.

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DON'T PANIC (but a tiny bit of radiation was found in U.S. milk)

DON'T PANIC (but a tiny bit of radiation was found in U.S. milk)

"Minuscule" amounts of iodine-131 was found in milk from Washington state.

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Don't Worry, Be Happy, Die Early

Don't Worry, Be Happy, Die Early

Happiness is tied to good health later in life, but childhood happiness does not predict longevity—in fact it does the opposite, according to a new report.

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Community Action Agencies Continue to Fight for Low-Income Families

Community Action Agencies Continue to Fight for Low-Income Families

Government works when it is directed towards helping its citizens live healthy and productive lives.

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Life-Threatening Mushroom Poisoning

Life-Threatening Mushroom Poisoning

Since Northern California's mushroom season began last September, four people have suffered life-threatening injuries after eating poisonous wild mushrooms.

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Missing Gene Suggests Rodents Aren't The Best Model For Diabetes Research

Missing Gene Suggests Rodents Aren't The Best Model For Diabetes Research

Rodents and other mammals might not be ideal for studying type 2 diabetes because of a gene that was deleted from the human genome millions of years ago.

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The Heroic Imagination Project

The Heroic Imagination Project

40 years ago, Stanford psychology professor Phillip Zimbardo's notorious Stanford Prison Experiment demonstrated how good people can do evil things. Now, his "Heroic Imagination Project" takes those lessons to an Oakland high school to see if heroes can also be made.

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Can Heroes Be Made?

Can Heroes Be Made?

If there is one thing Stanford Professor Phillip Zimbardo is known for, it's that normal people can be turned into sadists. Can he leave a more optimistic legacy and prove the opposite to be true?

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Scientists Understand Heart Disease Better, Still Give Bad Advice

Scientists Understand Heart Disease Better, Still Give Bad Advice

High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets have been used to treat high triglycerides since the 1960s.

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Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

After a series of high-profile recalls, the FDA says it's reconsidering rules that allow cheese makers to use unpasteurized milk in their products. That could mean big changes in Northern California, which has become a hub of artisanal cheese making.

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Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

Local Cheese Makers Fear a Raw Deal

Pasteurization may kill microbes like e.coli, but, they say, it also kills a cheese’s terroir, the unique taste associated with a particular place.

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