The Science of Sustainability

Health

Testing a New Drug for Mountain Sickness

Testing a New Drug for Mountain Sickness

Doctors have reported that common ibuprofen helps prevent altitude sickness. Read what it was like to be part of that research.

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Science in Your Life: The Magic Microwave

Science in Your Life: The Magic Microwave

Why doesn’t a microwave heat my food like a regular oven?

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Phylo: Turning Biology Puzzles Into Interactive Games

Phylo: Turning Biology Puzzles Into Interactive Games

People often think of medicine as hard work, but an emerging group of tech-savvy entrepreneurs is looking to re-shape people’s perspectives and turn health, and health research, into a form of play.

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Look at Nature, Get Happy

Look at Nature, Get Happy

What do hospitals and Costa Rica have in common? Science says: they both benefit from beautiful natural landscapes. In fact, we all do.

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Eavesdropping on the Heart: A Patient’s Campaign for Access

Eavesdropping on the Heart: A Patient’s Campaign for Access

You could call it a sort of Silicon Valley approach to health: Campos has had his genome sequenced; he sleeps with a sleep monitor, and goes nowhere without his pedometer. He wants the same access to the information coming out of his own heart.

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Surgeons Seek Kid-Sized Tools for the Operating Room

Surgeons Seek Kid-Sized Tools for the Operating Room

If you’ve ever spent time in Silicon Valley or among hi-tech entrepreneurs, you may have heard the term “Valley of Death.” It’s used to describe the huge gulf that can exist between coming up with a new idea, and getting a product to market. Well, this is a real problem in hospitals, too. Especially when it comes to kids.

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Got Science on the Brain? Come Blog with QUEST

Got Science on the Brain? Come Blog with QUEST

Got science on the brain? Come blog with us. KQED’s QUEST is looking to add new voices to our blog, which already offers commentary from our producers, reporters, and several writers from science organizations in our region. pply by February 1st.

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Got Mercury? The New EPA Ruling And The San Francisco Bay

Got Mercury? The New EPA Ruling And The San Francisco Bay

This week, after decades of legal delays and foot dragging by the coal and power industry, the EPA unveiled a new rule protecting public health from mercury and other toxins.

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Top KQED QUEST Stories of 2011

Top KQED QUEST Stories of 2011

From hackerspaces to banana slugs, flying telescopes to cheese – it's been a quite a diverse year of storytelling here at QUEST. Here's a round-up of the top 10 video and audio stories and blog posts that you've enjoyed from the past year.

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A-Head of the Curve: Interview with Concussion Expert Kevin Guskiewicz

A-Head of the Curve: Interview with Concussion Expert Kevin Guskiewicz

MacArthur "Genius" Kevin Guskiewicz discusses the research he and his team at UNC-Chapel Hill are conducting in the field of sports-related concussions.

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Flowers to Pharmacy

Flowers to Pharmacy

The nation's first hospital in Philadelphia culled its archives to create a collection of medical and botanical texts from the 18th and early 19th century.

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Can PTSD Nightmares Be Cured?

Can PTSD Nightmares Be Cured?

The hallmark of a healthy dream is its weirdness. PTSD dreams, in contrast, are like a broken record, the same, real-life event, played over and over again, in some patients, for decades.

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USGS at the Forefront of Saving Bats From White-Nose Syndrome (WNS)

USGS at the Forefront of Saving Bats From White-Nose Syndrome (WNS)

In the winter of 2007, residents of New York State began finding dead bats in their yards. Since then it’s estimated that more than a million bats have died from white-nose syndrome, a fuzzy white fungus that grows on their noses and wings.

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HIV: Searching For a Cure

HIV: Searching For a Cure

As we approach World AIDS Day, QUEST's Andrea Kissack talks with one of the world's top HIV/AIDS researchers about progress in the search to find a cure.

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Exoskeletons Walk Forward

Exoskeletons Walk Forward

An exoskeleton suit may seem like science fiction, turning ordinary humans into super heroes, but wearable robots are moving forward into reality.

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Growing Skin

Growing Skin

Biomedical researchers are investigating ways to 'grow' new skin in hopes that healing burns can be quicker, safer and more complete.

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The Twinsburg John Doe: Forensic Reconstruction

The Twinsburg John Doe: Forensic Reconstruction

The Twinsburg John Doe case is an especially tough one, and the Summit County Police Department and the Medical Examiner’s office need help identifying this man.  No dental records have been found that match his teeth.  I hope my facial reconstruction will jog someone’s memory, and that he will be recognized. Background for Twinsburg Case […]

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Science on the SPOT: Resurrecting the Dead

Science on the SPOT: Resurrecting the Dead

QUEST travels to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History to meet Linda Spurlock, an anatomist and forensic reconstruction artist who uses clay to re-construct the faces of ancient humans in order to show what they looked like when alive. She also sketches more recently deceased people using only their remains in order to help police solve crimes.

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From Swords to Test Tubes: The Million Veteran Program

From Swords to Test Tubes: The Million Veteran Program

A massive database like what the VA is building would allow scientists to compare thousands of anonymous medical records with just a few keystrokes, to study conditions such as cancer and PTSD.

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Vitamin E Supplements Increase Prostate Cancer Risk

Vitamin E Supplements Increase Prostate Cancer Risk

400 IU of vitamin E daily increases risk of prostate cancer by 17%.

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