The Science of Sustainability

Climate

Darfur Stoves Project

Darfur Stoves Project

Since the Darfur crisis began in 2003, women living in the refugee camps walked for up to seven hours outside the safety of the camps to collect firewood for cooking, putting them at risk for violent attacks. Now, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have engineered a more efficient wood-burning stove, which is greatly reducing both the women's need for firewood and the threats against them.

Continue Reading

The Sweet Science of Chocolate

The Sweet Science of Chocolate

Everybody loves chocolate, but did you know that small daily doses of dark chocolate are good for your health? Read the story and watch the video to learn about the precision engineering and chemistry behind the beloved treat.

Continue Reading

Should Fracking Be Banned?

Should Fracking Be Banned?

From KQED Education Do Now: On Tuesday, November 4, 2014 three counties in California will decide by ballot whether or not to ban hydraulic fracturing, otherwise known as “fracking.” It’s steeped in controversy, from the amount of water it uses to how and where that water–and added chemicals–are eventually disposed. Should fracking be banned? Why or why not?

Continue Reading

California Voters to Decide $7.5 Billion Water Bond Measure

California Voters to Decide $7.5 Billion Water Bond Measure

Learn about Proposition One, which would issue billions in bonds for water projects.

Continue Reading

How Do We Prioritize Protecting Species in the Face of Climate Change?

How Do We Prioritize Protecting Species in the Face of Climate Change?

From KQED Education Do Now: The Earth is warming. Since the early 20th Century, the global average temperature has increased approximately 1.4°F. How do we balance protecting species with human interests in dealing with and adapting to climate change? What do we prioritize?

Continue Reading

Are Consumers or Corporations Responsible for Reducing Carbon Emissions?

Are Consumers or Corporations Responsible for Reducing Carbon Emissions?

From KQED Education Do Now: Climate change has been on the minds of a lot of people with the release of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and the third National Climate Assessment. Who is responsible for curtailing carbon emissions?

Continue Reading

Fossil Burrows Shed Light on Great Plains' Roots

Fossil Burrows Shed Light on Great Plains' Roots

The Great Plains didn't evolve in a vacuum. Ancient rodents helped shape the ecosystem we know today. Fossil burrows are helping scientists figure out how.

Continue Reading

Drought Re-shaping the Cattle Map

Drought Re-shaping the Cattle Map

Cattle are leaving drought-parched pastures to go where the grass is greener and it could lead to long-term changes in the industry.

Continue Reading

Antarctic Glacier's Retreat "Unstoppable"

Antarctic Glacier's Retreat "Unstoppable"

The West Antarctic Ice Sheet is melting, and new research points to its collapse in as little as two hundred years. The likely result: global sea level rise of 10-13 feet.

Continue Reading

Fire Returns to The Great Plains

Fire Returns to The Great Plains

Fire can be dangerous, but it's not always a bad thing. On the Great Plains, firefighters, ecologists, and ranchers are slowly trying to make fire a part of the region's ecosystem again.

Continue Reading

Using Science to Grow Better Strawberries

Using Science to Grow Better Strawberries

Watch how scientists and farmers work together to grow strawberries in hostile climates.

Continue Reading

As Tropics Expand, Tropical Storms Follow

As Tropics Expand, Tropical Storms Follow

Tropical storms like hurricanes and typhoons are reaching their peak intensity further and further from the equator.

Continue Reading

Picturing a Future Wrought by Climate Change

Picturing a Future Wrought by Climate Change

In this video, follow a University of Wisconsin research team creating scenarios visualizing what the climate in Madison, Wisconsin could look like in the year 2070.

Continue Reading

Biodegradable Plastics: Too Good to Be True?

Biodegradable Plastics: Too Good to Be True?

Products advertised as “green” aren't always what they appear to be. New research from Ohio State University adds supposedly biodegradable plastics to that list.

Continue Reading

In Wood We Trust

In Wood We Trust

Does milling wood pellets in North Carolina and shipping them to Europe make sense?

Continue Reading

Drought Risk Atlas Uses Past to Predict Future: A Q&A with Climatologist Mark Svoboda

Drought Risk Atlas Uses Past to Predict Future: A Q&A with Climatologist Mark Svoboda

A new tool promises to help decision makers and the public better understand and prepare for future drought.

Continue Reading

Food Scraps:  An Urbanite’s Dilemma

Food Scraps: An Urbanite’s Dilemma

When it comes to doing what’s best for the environment, compost is king. But sometimes it doesn’t fit into city life. Garbage disposals offer a simpler solution for getting rid of food scraps, but how do they stack up?

Continue Reading

Keeping Cows Cool as Temps Heat Up

Keeping Cows Cool as Temps Heat Up

If you’re looking for relief on an unusually hot summer day, so are the cows grazing in the pastures. When temperatures climb, milk production drops.

Continue Reading

The Roots of the Carbon Cycle

The Roots of the Carbon Cycle

Play this interactive to learn how changing conditions in soil may affect the carbon cycle.

Continue Reading

Secrets of the Global Seed Vault: A Conversation with Scientist Luigi Guarino

Secrets of the Global Seed Vault: A Conversation with Scientist Luigi Guarino

Explore the inner workings of a mysterious seed vault on a remote island near the North Pole. Scientist Luigi Guarino talks to QUEST about this initiative to safeguard the future of the world’s food diversity.

Continue Reading