The Science of Sustainability

Biology

Web Extra: How Hummingbird Got Fire

Web Extra: How Hummingbird Got Fire

Chariman of the Amah-Mutsun Ohlone tribal band, Valentin Lopez, reads the legend of how Hummingbird got fire from the Badger People.

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Autism More than Genes

Autism More than Genes

A new twin study suggests that the environment may play a bigger role in autism than scientists previously thought.

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Gulls Threaten South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Work

Gulls Threaten South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Work

One of the most ambitious wetland restoration projects in the country is underway in San Francisco Bay. Thousands of acres of those ponds are being restored for shorebirds and wildlife.

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The State of the Ocean

The State of the Ocean

The ocean is our planet’s heartbeat, and the future heartbeat for billions of humans.

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Bioplastic Boom

Bioplastic Boom

Companies like Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and Heinz ketchup have determined that plastic made from plants — not oil — makes sense both for the environment and for business. The growing demand has meant a boom in the bioplastic industry. Could this mean the end of the plastic bottle as we know it?

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Patient-Specific DNA Sequencing Finally Paying Off

Patient-Specific DNA Sequencing Finally Paying Off

Here Dr. Starr talks about three patients who have dramatically improved lives because scientists sequenced their DNA and correctly interpreted the results. The dream of helping individual patients using data from the human genome project is finally being realized.

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Sea Lions, Herring, and Climate Change

Sea Lions, Herring, and Climate Change

I thought I’d check in on the sea lions at Pier 39. Just a few years ago, there were about 1600 of them. Then in 2009, most of them swam away.

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Color Evolution in Nudibranchs

Color Evolution in Nudibranchs

Dr. Rebecca Johnson, postdoctoral researcher from the California Academy of Sciences, tells why nudibranchs evolved to have such beautiful and brilliant color patterns to aid in their defense.

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Summer Solstice, Shifting Spring

Summer Solstice, Shifting Spring

Tomorrow is our summer solstice—the longest day of the year here in the Northern Hemisphere.

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The Cloud in the Silver Lining

The Cloud in the Silver Lining

There are no free lunches in genetics. Having a certain version of a gene may protect you from one thing, but make you susceptible to another.

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The Search for Alcoholism's Miracle Drug

The Search for Alcoholism's Miracle Drug

At one hospital in San Francisco, more than half of the patients in an alcohol abuse program refuse medications that could help them stop drinking. So Bay Area scientists find themselves waging two campaigns: to develop drugs that work, and to convince alcoholics to take them.

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The Curious and Infamous Camel Spider

The Curious and Infamous Camel Spider

Although not a spider, the camel spiders – also known as the wind scorpion or sun spider – has taken its place amongst many tall tales and urban legends.

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After Earth Day, Celebrate the Other 71% with World Oceans Day

After Earth Day, Celebrate the Other 71% with World Oceans Day

It's time to celebrate our ocean with World Oceans Day.

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Dominant isn't Always Common

Dominant isn't Always Common

A common genetic misconception is that dominant means common. Here Dr. Starr explains why dominant and recessive doesn't matter for how common a trait is.

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Producer's Notes – Science on the SPOT: Lupe the Mammoth Comes to Life

Producer's Notes – Science on the SPOT: Lupe the Mammoth Comes to Life

UC Museum of Paleontology graduate student Kaitlin Maguire describes her behind-the-scenes experiences working to bring a mammoth exhibit to life at the Children's Discovery Museum of San Jose.

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Science on the SPOT: Lupe the Mammoth Comes to Life

Science on the SPOT: Lupe the Mammoth Comes to Life

In 2005, a partial skeleton of a juvenile mammoth was discovered along the Guadalupe River near downtown San Jose. A full-scale replica is now featured in a new exhibit at the Children's Discovery Museum in San Jose. Learn more with Kaitlin Maguire from the UC Museum of Paleontology about these majestic creatures that roamed the Bay Area during the Ice Age.

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Report from the Philippines

Report from the Philippines

Here in the field, time passes slowly but the need to explore, explain and protect natural systems like Philippine coral reef systems is urgent.

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Producer's Notes: Angst in the Redwoods

Producer's Notes: Angst in the Redwoods

Even circus workers have safety nets. The folks who climb giant redwoods don’t.

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Uncovering Risk One Gene at a Time

Uncovering Risk One Gene at a Time

Genetic tests for complex diseases just tell you part of your genetic risk and nothing about your environmental risks.

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Geological Outings Around the Bay: Ring Mountain

Geological Outings Around the Bay: Ring Mountain

The body of rock underlying the central Tiburon Peninsula is the rarest and most scientifically precious part of the Franciscan Complex, an assemblage of materials that was once involved in subduction.

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