The Science of Sustainability

Biology

Fantastic Voyage: The Salmon's Uphill Struggle for Survival

Fantastic Voyage: The Salmon's Uphill Struggle for Survival

California's critically endangered coho salmon are at a crossroads. Hundreds of thousands of fish once returned to our streams to spawn. But dams, water diversion, and habitat destruction have pushed the coho to the brink of extinction. Without heroic habitat restoration and water conservation efforts, we may lose our storied silver fish.

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Beautiful Slime

Beautiful Slime

Ross's film Leviathans is on display at the Vast and Undetectable exhibit in the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery.

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Evolution, Easy as Can Be

Evolution, Easy as Can Be

Evolving from something simple like a single celled beast into a slug, mushroom, cactus or a human seems impossibly hard. The series of precise DNA changes you need is mind-boggling to think about. Unless, of course, the changes are easier than we imagine.

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A Birder’s-Eye View of Conservation

A Birder’s-Eye View of Conservation

The Great Backyard Bird Count gives novice Bay Area wildlife watchers the chance to play field biologist in their own backyards and help scientists gather data on the incidence, abundance, and distribution of birds. Researchers will use sightings to identify trends that will help conserve these valuable indicators of biodiversity.

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One Whale's Tale

One Whale's Tale

A rooftop is a long way from the deep blue sea, so when I learned that the skull of a juvenile minke whale was resting atop the California Academy of Sciences' living roof, my curiosity was piqued.

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What Can Lake Vostok Tell Us About Europa?

What Can Lake Vostok Tell Us About Europa?

Does the prospect of life in subglacial Lake Vostok really point to the same on the icy satellite Europa? The answer may surprise you.

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California’s Gray Wolves

California’s Gray Wolves

When a gray wolf wearing a GPS collar crossed from Oregon into California in December, it was the first wild gray wolf to tread on California soil since the 1920s. It is debatable whether this lone wolf is a sign of things to come, but if wolves return to California, their role in the ecosystem will be different than it was in times past.

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Science Fair for the Rest of Us

Science Fair for the Rest of Us

If you want to do a science fair project, one of the best places to do one in the South Bay is at Schmahl Science.

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Feeling Biocurious? How To Get Your DIY Bio On

Feeling Biocurious? How To Get Your DIY Bio On

Maybe you have an idea to make bacteria that can sense or even break down mercury in the environment. Or you just always wanted to do some biology. Where can you turn?

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The Benefits of Radioactive Fallout

The Benefits of Radioactive Fallout

Wildlife seems to be thriving in the radioactive areas around Chernobyl. For now it looks like if animals had to choose, they'd choose radioactivity over humans.

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Got Science on the Brain? Come Blog with QUEST

Got Science on the Brain? Come Blog with QUEST

Got science on the brain? Come blog with us. KQED’s QUEST is looking to add new voices to our blog, which already offers commentary from our producers, reporters, and several writers from science organizations in our region. pply by February 1st.

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Homegrown Fruit in the New Year

Homegrown Fruit in the New Year

Is your new year’s resolution to eat more fruits and veggies? Or eat more local produce? You can do both at once by growing your own fruit—you can’t get more local than fruit you harvest in your own backyard.

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We Don’t Want the Funk (in our Wine)

We Don’t Want the Funk (in our Wine)

Scientists are using DNA sequencing to protect our wines by keeping future sulfite-resistant forms of the yeast Brettanomyces bruxellensis at bay.

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Got Mercury? The New EPA Ruling And The San Francisco Bay

Got Mercury? The New EPA Ruling And The San Francisco Bay

This week, after decades of legal delays and foot dragging by the coal and power industry, the EPA unveiled a new rule protecting public health from mercury and other toxins.

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Sand: Hold a Mountain in Your Hand

Sand: Hold a Mountain in Your Hand

Sand . . . we play in it, we stroll on it, we make castles out of it, but what do we really know about it? The size, shape and location of a grain a sand can tell us a lot about it's origin, makeup and history.

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Top KQED QUEST Stories of 2011

Top KQED QUEST Stories of 2011

From hackerspaces to banana slugs, flying telescopes to cheese – it's been a quite a diverse year of storytelling here at QUEST. Here's a round-up of the top 10 video and audio stories and blog posts that you've enjoyed from the past year.

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O Perfect Christmas Tree

O Perfect Christmas Tree

The Berkeley students from the Forestry Club described their trees as “free range,” in contrast to trees from Christmas tree farms, which are painstakingly grown to be perfect.

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Algae…Soylent Green…and the Future of Biofuel

Algae…Soylent Green…and the Future of Biofuel

Can a renewable plant really replace crude oil? Find out how algae is becoming the fuel of the future — grown like a farm crop.

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Biofuels Face a Reality Check

Biofuels Face a Reality Check

Despite the buzz around biofuels, the industry been slow to scale up. But Bay Area researchers are making breakthroughs that could move us one step closer to having our cars run on fuels from plants.

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Gaming to Understand Disease

Gaming to Understand Disease

By playing Phylo, you help scientists better understand human disease and you get to have fun. Doing good by having fun is a win-win for scientists and the public.

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