The Science of Sustainability

Biology

Personalized Medicine: A Potential Tool for Predicting Disease?

Personalized Medicine: A Potential Tool for Predicting Disease?

We may finally be at the threshold of the age of personalized medicine. In a recent study, scientists were able to predict that a man was at a higher risk for developing Type 2 diabetes and over a two-year period tracked his health as he developed the disease.

Continue Reading

Tag Along On Science Adventures: The Field Trip Podcast

Tag Along On Science Adventures: The Field Trip Podcast

Season 2 of the science podcast, "The Field Trip" premieres today.

Continue Reading

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can We Bring Back What We've Lost?

California's Delta is a far cry from what it once was. About 97% of its historic marshes have been lost and scientists aren’t quite sure what the Delta once looked like. Now, a Bay Area group is working to reconstruct it through ecological detective work.

Continue Reading

“The Art of Nature” Educates and Inspires

“The Art of Nature” Educates and Inspires

The First Friday Art Tour took place on May 4th at the Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History's exhibit, "The Art of Nature."

Continue Reading

Exploring Corals of the Deep

Exploring Corals of the Deep

Off California's coastline, thousands of feet below the deep blue ocean where the sun's rays don't reach, teems a diverse community of deep sea corals. Armed with unmanned submarines equipped with robotic arms, sensors and HD cameras, scientists are exploring this treasure trove of corals and the rich marine life living among them.

Continue Reading

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can it Be Fixed?

California's Deadlocked Delta: Can it Be Fixed?

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta has been the subject of a decades-long water war, but most Californians have never heard of it. Why is it so important? And can the state ever break the water deadlock?

Continue Reading

Different Deltas: Q&A with Jason Peltier of Westlands Water District

Different Deltas: Q&A with Jason Peltier of Westlands Water District

QUEST Radio Reporter Lauren Sommer interviews Jason Peltier, Deputy General Manager of Westlands Water District, a 600,000 acre agricultural district on the west side of the San Joaquin valley.

Continue Reading

Different Deltas: Q&A with Barry Nelson of the Natural Resources Defense Council

Different Deltas: Q&A with Barry Nelson of the Natural Resources Defense Council

QUEST Radio Reporter Lauren Sommer interviews Barry Nelson, Senior Policy Analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council about the pressures on the Delta ecosystem and the competing plans to manage them.

Continue Reading

What is California’s Delta?

What is California’s Delta?

If you’re like most Californians, you’ve probably never heard of the Delta or why it’s important to the state’s economy and wildlife. In three minutes, we’ll explain how the Delta is a key part of California’s water supply and why it’s been the focus of a decades-long water battle.

Continue Reading

Classification Challenge: Documenting Microbes, Biodiversity’s Hidden Treasure

Classification Challenge: Documenting Microbes, Biodiversity’s Hidden Treasure

Figuring out how many species inhabit Earth remains one of science’s most enduring, and elusive, challenges.

Continue Reading

Can Ancient Fish Art Inform Modern Fish Science?

Can Ancient Fish Art Inform Modern Fish Science?

Groupers are enormous fish. Some species grow over two meters long and weigh hundreds of kilograms. Fortunately for groupers and for the scientists studying them, these fish are aesthetically appealing as well as huge and tasty.

Continue Reading

Desperately Seeking Autism Genes

Desperately Seeking Autism Genes

Autism is incredibly frustrating from a genetic point of view. Every study clearly shows that genetics plays an important role in this disease. But when these studies try to find a cause, they keep coming up short.

Continue Reading

Salmon Runs, Grizzly Bear Dreams

Salmon Runs, Grizzly Bear Dreams

Using grizzly bears in the Pacific Northwest as a proxy for the benefits salmon deliver to ecological communities, a new study argues that letting more salmon migrate into coastal streams will lead to downstream improvements for the ecosystem and eventually the offshore salmon catch.

Continue Reading

Science on the SPOT: New Hope for Heart Repair

Science on the SPOT: New Hope for Heart Repair

Scientists in San Francisco have coaxed mouse hearts to repair themselves from within.The breakthrough could lead to treatments for 5 million people in the United States whose hearts were damaged after they survived heart attacks.

Continue Reading

Stanford Marine Biologists Share Their Artistic Side

Stanford Marine Biologists Share Their Artistic Side

The third annual Hopkins Marine Station Amateur Art Show was held this past weekend in Monterey, California.

Continue Reading

Divining Human History with DNA

Divining Human History with DNA

Everyone knows about how genetics is changing how we look at and treat human disease. But what may be less appreciated is what it can tell us about human history.

Continue Reading

Wildflowers are Waking Up in the Bay Area

Wildflowers are Waking Up in the Bay Area

Around San Francisco Bay this time of year, the open hills and valleys are a rich green velvet. Lengthening days and spring rains are coaxing the grasses and wildflowers to life.

Continue Reading

Cinematic Science from The Farm to France

Cinematic Science from The Farm to France

Monday was the 182nd birthday of Eadward Muybridge, the moving picture pioneer who first answered the question: Do all four feet of a galloping horse leave the ground at once? Muybridge's remarkable contributions to film often overshadow his instrumental role in kickstarting the science of biomechanics . . .

Continue Reading

What Makes It So Easy To Be Green (in Nature)?

What Makes It So Easy To Be Green (in Nature)?

At a fundamental level, green objects look green because they reflect green wavelengths of light back to our eyes, while absorbing red and yellow. But organisms have evolved to be green for a wide variety of reasons.

Continue Reading

Science on the SPOT: Monarch Meetup

Science on the SPOT: Monarch Meetup

Monarch butterflies migrate from all over the western United States to overwinter along the California coast. Conservation Biologist Stu Weiss uses specialized photographic equipment to study what makes good monarch overwintering habitat.

Continue Reading